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Coronavirus in Wisconsin: Historical updates from April 19-25

Posted at 9:33 AM, Apr 26, 2020
and last updated 2020-04-26 11:06:13-04

This page features historical updates related to coronavirus in Wisconsin and will not be updated. For the latest, go to https://www.tmj4.com/coronavirus

As the 2019 novel coronavirus continues to spread across the country and the world, TMJ4 News is tracking how every day life in Wisconsin is changing as schools, businesses, governments, and more react. Bookmark this page for the latest updates on how COVID-19 is affecting daily life.

As of Saturday, 5,687 people have tested positive for COVID-19 in Wisconsin. 266 people have died. 57,138 people have tested negative. Here is the latest county-by-county data:

Wisconsin CountyPositive as of 4/25/2020Negative as of 4/25/2020Deaths as of 4/25/2020Rate (positive cases per 100,000 people) as of 4/25/2020Case fatality percentage (percent of cases who died) as of 4/25/2020
Adams4133119.925%
Ashland2102012.70%
Barron6675013.30%
Bayfield3124120.033%
Brown7201,8682277.20%
Buffalo4159130.425%
Burnett07400.00%
Calumet7310014.10%
Chippewa20870031.40%
Clark19184155.15%
Columbia27654147.44%
Crawford3187018.40%
Dane4018,2602175.75%
Dodge23790126.24%
Door10120136.410%
Douglas9446020.70%
Dunn9844020.20%
Eau Claire241,680023.30%
Florence218046.10%
Fond du Lac671,222365.54%
Forest04600.00%
Grant28509354.011%
Green11277029.80%
Green Lake115905.30%
Iowa7228029.60%
Iron237135.050%
Jackson12237158.58%
Jefferson39761046.10%
Juneau12289145.48%
Kenosha3291,6757195.42%
Kewaunee10103149.110%
La Crosse261,802022.10%
Lafayette494023.90%
Langlade08700.00%
Lincoln016500.00%
Manitowoc9291011.30%
Marathon18585113.36%
Marinette7288117.314%
Marquette3144119.733%
Menominee127021.80%
Milwaukee2,52512,210157264.66%
Monroe14646030.80%
Oconto6240016.00%
Oneida6258017.00%
Outagamie431,101223.35%
Ozaukee82798992.911%
Pepin09900.00%
Pierce8357019.20%
Polk423709.20%
Portage425705.70%
Price16807.40%
Racine2551,76610130.54%
Richland10221157.010%
Rock1511,533493.33%
Rusk4107028.20%
Sauk38663359.88%
Sawyer2230012.20%
Shawano8290019.50%
Sheboygan44734238.25%
St. Croix13420014.80%
Taylor08300.00%
Trempealeau242806.80%
Vernon134003.30%
Vilas4121018.50%
Walworth1326708128.16%
Washburn114906.40%
Washington921,524468.44%
Waukesha2993,1711475.05%
Waupaca7324113.614%
Waushara214708.30%
Winnebago481,037128.22%
Wood238502.70%
Total5,68757,13826698.45%

Latest updates:

Saturday, April 25

3:39 p.m. -- Wisconsin reports largest 1-day increase of COVID-19 cases

MILWAUKEE (AP) — Wisconsin health officials report that 331 tests for the coronavirus have come back positive in the last 24 hours, the largest single-day rise since the outbreak started.

An additional four people have died. The update raises the total number of positive cases to 5,687 and the statewide deaths to 266. State Department of Health Services data shows that 24 percent of infected people have been hospitalized.

The actual number of infections is thought to be far higher because many people have not been tested, and studies suggest people can be infected with the virus without feeling sick.

10 a.m. -- Evers' stay-at-home extension draws anger, pleas for help

MADISON, Wis. (AP) — Wisconsin residents bombarded Gov. Tony Evers' office in the hours surrounding his decision to extend the state's stay-at-home order with hundreds of emails blasting him for destroying the state's economy and begging him to let their business remain open, records The Associated Press obtained show.

Evers' website received about 6,435 messages between the morning of April 16 and 5 p.m. on April 17, the day Evers extended stay-at-home to May 26.

A majority of senders opposed the order. Some called the extension “political suicide" for the governor.

Friday, April 24

10:24 p.m. -- Sherman Park family mourns loss of brother, friend to COVID-19

Week after week, data shows the coronavirus continues to impact minority communities in Milwaukee County, especially.

As of Friday, African-Americans accounted for more than half of Milwaukee County's 145 deaths.

One of them is Pamela Redmond's only brother, Billy Ross.

"Billy and I were really close," Redmond said. "Our cousin used to call us Pebbles and Bam Bam when we were growing up."

Ross, 53, was taken to St. Joseph's Hospital in Milwaukee after family says he collapsed at work on April 8. According to a report from the Milwaukee County Medical Examiner, Ross spent several days in the ICU until he died on April 13. He leaves behind his parents, three children, and dozens of close friends.

"I will always his smile, and I will always remember his voice, he had a way of just consuming the room," Redmond said.

9:46 p.m. -- Milwaukee hospitality leaders look for vacations to play a role in the economic rebound

Milwaukee had big plans for the year when it comes to tourism before the coronavirus pandemic.

Now with millions of dollars lost, hospitality leaders are looking ahead for a time when it is safe to reopen, and they can bring visitors back.

"We started this year as the year of Milwaukee. We were going to start off with a bang," said Peggy Williams-Smith, President and CEO of VISIT Milwaukee.

Williams-Smith said Milwaukee had months of booked up hotel rooms even before the Democratic National Convention.

"There was a $47 million impact lost in the days following the initial Safer at Home order when these conventions canceled," said Williams-Smith.

That translates into 6,100 canceled hotel rooms in the City of Milwaukee.

7:23 p.m. -- People from across Wisconsin rally at State Capitol to protest 'Safer at Home' extension

People across Wisconsin traveled to Madison Friday afternoon to rally against the state's 'Safer at Home' order on the day it was initially set to end. Governor Tony Evers recently extended it to at least May 26.

For hours protesters cheered to reopen Wisconsin outside the State Capitol, many with signs in hand hoping to make their voices heard. It went on as planned after a permit to hold it on State Capitol grounds was denied.

Nancy Wiitala, who lives in Taylor County, feels that the extension of the order is going to devastate businesses trying to survive.

"The state is overreaching, and it's hurting way more people than the COVID itself is," Wiitala said. "It's getting hard on small businesses everywhere. It's going to have a domino effect on the next business."

Denis Navratil, who lives in Racine, is one of these people.

"I never anticipated anything happening that could make my sales drop 100 percent overnight," Navratil said.

6:50 p.m. -- What is contact tracing? A closer look at tracking the spread of coronavirus

"Contact tracing" means having a team of "health detectives" in place to interview anyone who's tested positive for coronavirus, about their interactions with others.

Then, notifying those other people about their possible exposure. It's believed to be a key component in stopping the spread of COVID-19 at the local, state, and national levels.

In TMJ4's "Safer at Home" Town Hall, Milwaukee Mayor Tom Barrett revealed he's looking into utilizing some staff from Milwaukee Public Schools for contact tracing.

"We're working with MPS to see if we can use some of their nurses," he said.

The Mayor's office confirming Friday they've "begun the process of partnering with MPS and recruiting nurses."

MPS says plans are very preliminary, but the district wants to support the city's efforts.

6:04 p.m. -- DHS: Wisconsin healthcare workers account for 16 percent of COVID-19 cases

New numbers in Wisconsin show medical professionals in the state make up for more than 15 percent of COVID-19 statewide.

According to the Wisconsin Department of Health Services, healthcare workers make up 16 percent of all COVID-19 cases in the state.

Of Wisconsin's 5,356 cases, 857 of those involve healthcare professionals.

Nurse practitioner Octavia Manuel-Wright knew going into nursing meant putting others first.

Manuel-Wright is the president of "Black Nurses Rock Milwaukee," a group supporting nurses and highlighting them through events and social media.

"I have a lot of nurses in-boxing me, calling and sending messages on social media saying they don't have supplies.," Manuel-Wright said.

She said many in her group are reusing personal protective equipment due to shortages.

"People are doing, literally, that they have to do," Manuel-Wright said.

Those concerns are echoed with the Wisconsin Nurses Association, which recently surveyed its members.

"I would say over 30 percent of our members responded that they don't believe they have PPE," said Gina Dennik-Champion, executive director of the Wisconsin Nurses Association.

5:49 p.m. -- Local business finds answer to keep employees working during pandemic

A Milwaukee small business received a loan from the Paycheck Protection Program (PPP), allowing them to creatively expand while taking care of their employees during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Bars and Recreation owns four bars in the city; Splash Studio, 9 Below, Axe MKE and North-South Club. Their business motto is "Let's play, Milwaukee." However, because of the closures, they haven't been able to do that.

"We do axe throwing, we do mini-golf," Marla Poytinger, president of Bars and Recreation said. "How can we bring this to people where they are? We had to reinvent the wheel with Head Space Trivia."

Head Space Trivia uses Zoom as a platform to allow dozens of users to participate virtually in a bar-trivia style game. There is a trivia host (the Head Master) and an assistant of sorts (the Spacekeeper). Users see questions on the screen and answer them on their phones. They also include mini-games like, showing the Head Master a flower for extra points.

It's a way for employees throughout the Bars and Recreation system to do what they do best and be creative. All while being able to earn a paycheck. But it's more than money for them.

"As an experienced based company, your employees need to be happy and having fun and care about more than just their paycheck," Poytinger said. "Then they can bring that energy to the customers and make sure customers are having fun and feeling comfortable after a long day at work."

4:38 p.m. -- City of Kenosha to close its city pools for the entire summer due to COVID-19

Due to the unpredictable future of COVID-19, the City of Kenosha has decided to close all city pools for the entire summer.

The public pools at Washington Park and Anderson park will be closed for the remainder of the 2020 season.

City administrators decided not to open the pools in June like usual, and will not reschedule an opening date.

The city says opening later in the season would lead to challenges when it comes to filling lifeguard positions.

4:29 p.m. -- Marquette University spring commencement ceremony rescheduled to August 30

Marquette University has rescheduled its commencement ceremony after they were forced to postpone due to the coronavirus pandemic.

After announcing that they would be canceling the commencement ceremony, Marquette conducted a survey asking seniors how they hope to celebrate their graduation.

According to Marquette University, approximately 1,800 students took part in the survey. The majority of them said they would prefer an in-person ceremony once it is safe to do so.

Because of the survey results, Marquette has rescheduled the commencement to Sunday, August 30, at Fiserv Forum. However, only the professional schools will host their own ceremonies. These schools are the School of Dentistry, the Law School, and the Health Sciences professional degrees.

The individual colleges will host receptions during the August 29–30 weekend.

4:18 p.m. -- Milwaukee Police Department says they will enforce 'Safer at Home' ordinance violations

The Milwaukee Police Department and the Milwaukee Health Department will soon issue citations for violations of Governor Tony Evers' "Safer at Home" order.

Effective May 2, the Milwaukee Common Council will allow both departments to issue the "Violation or Obstruction of Orders" citation. It can be issued by MPD officers and members of the health department to any individual who willfully violates or obstructs the execution of the order.

Officers can issue citations with fines up to $500 to people who don't comply with Gov. Evers' order.

The citation does not replace the option to arrest and pursue criminal charges under state statute.

1:27 p.m. -- Wisconsin Supreme Court rejects releasing prisoners

The Wisconsin Supreme Court has rejected a lawsuit seeking the release of inmates from state prisons as a way to reduce the risk of them contracting the coronavirus.

The court on Friday declined to take a lawsuit filed earlier this month by the American Civil Liberties Union of Wisconsin on behalf of two inmates with preexisting conditions.

The court, in an unsigned order, noted steps taken by the state Department of Corrections to mitigate risks to inmates.

The court said it was not within its powers to assign someone to determine which inmates should be released, as the lawsuit sought.

12:44 p.m. -- Wisconsin's extended Safer at Home order relaxes restrictions on non-essential businesses

Wisconsin's extended 'Safer-at-Home' order began Friday, lifting some of the restrictions previously put in place on non-essential businesses throughout the state.

The governor's order allows public libraries, arts and craft stores, and other non-essential businesses to re-open and offer curbside and delivery services. Golf courses are also allowed to open under new guidelines.

Leaders at Milwaukee Public Libraries are still trying to determine if they will open, according to a librarian on April 24.

Strict social distancing rules and essential travel guidelines remain in place until May 26.

"To me it’s just a challenge to be creative," said Steph Davies, who owns The Waxwing, a local shop that sells handmade art pieces and goods. "I have been a non-essential business, which means the curbside and the delivery was not really in the realm of what we should be doing. So, that opens us up to be a part of that."

Davies had been relying solely on online sales and mailed deliveries for the past several weeks as Coronavirus forced her customers to stay away from her storefront on Milwaukee's East side. Now, because of the lifted restrictions under the Governor's newly extended order, Davies can offer curbside and delivery sales and she will be able to bring back at least two of her employees.

"It's nice to have them back on board and support them," said Davies.

Area golf courses are also allowed to re-open. Eight courses in Milwaukee County opened at 8 a.m. on Friday.

Under the new Safer at Home extension, all golfers must reserve and pay for their round of golf online or by phone, golfers must practice social distancing, and club houses and pro-shops must remains closed.

Reggie Riley was among the first golfers to show up at Lincoln Park Golf Course Friday and he said he did not feel unsafe returning to the tee.

7:50 a.m. -- Rally will go on as planned at state Capitol

People planning to rally Friday against Wisconsin's "Safer at Home" order say they will proceed, even though their permit to hold it on Capitol grounds, was denied.

Similar to the rally in Brookfield last Saturday, the one scheduled in Madison is expected to be much bigger. It has the potential to be the largest to date in Wisconsin, with thousands saying on Facebook that they're going. Nearly 12,000 more say they're interested in going.

Thursday, April 23

10:01 p.m. -- Community members urge more online schooling from Milwaukee Public Schools

Community members urge Milwaukee Public Schools to go entirely online, so students do not fall further behind.

MPS is working on getting Chromebook computers to every child in the district who needs one, but that process is not complete.

When the coronavirus pandemic shut down schools in March, Milwaukee Public Schools moved "Stop, Grab and Go" distribution sites. There are 25 locations that children can get breakfast, lunch, and a packet of school work.

"That's a good start, I guess, but moving to online learning is going to be infinitely better," said Helen Harris.

Harris has two grandchildren in Milwaukee schools, and she is a former MPS administrator. She says she knows they can be doing what suburban schools are doing. That's why she, along with a half a dozen community members from the group Wisconsin Common Grounds, wrote into the school board to ask for online learning and accountability.

"One of the main things I want to see is actually reaching and learning with teachers actually teaching curriculum," said Harris.

Thursday night, Superintendent Keith Posley spoke about the move towards more online learning at the school board meeting. Teachers will offer online engagements with students starting April 27th. But school board members say they are hearing concerns that not everyone has gotten a computer and even if they have one lacks online access.

9:33 p.m. -- Green Bay police to issue fines for not following 'Safer at Home' order

Cases continue to spike in Brown County. The total confirmed cases are now more than 500.

Starting Friday, if you're not following the Governor's Safer at Home order, it could cost you hundreds.

"When I say we respond to complaints, we've responded to hundreds of violations of the order whether it's businesses or people," said Commander Kevin Warych with the Green Bay Police department.

It's a problem Brown County says we're facing, not enough people are social distancing.

"That spike in positive cases appears to have started around the Easter holiday," said Claire Paprocki with the Brown County Health department. "We've seen some communities gathering together on that holiday."

As cases hit 517 in the county Thursday, health officials warn this isn't the end.

"We will continue to see higher case numbers due to aggressive and an increase in testing at the three facilities," Paprocki added.

Paprocki said this means only leave your house for the essentials; don't go to your neighbor's house for a bonfire or don't visit someone even in your own apartment building.

Starting Friday, a new ordinance in Green Bay will allow police to fine someone for not following these rules. It's a municipal citation that will cost you $376; but it's something Warych said they don't want to have to do.

If you are fined, Warych said the ticket would read as a violation of law relating to public health. He also adds, law enforcement will not pull you over without cause to see if you're violating the Safer at Home order.

9:18 p.m. -- TMJ4 News hosts 'Safer at Home' virtual town hall

TMJ4 News hosted a virtual town hall Thursday to go in-depth on Wisconsin's "Safer at Home" order and the ongoing lawsuit to try and end it.

Governor Tony Evers, Assembly Speaker Robin Vos, and Milwaukee Mayor Tom Barrett took part.

Leaders across the state of Wisconsin are working to figure how we can rebound from the coronavirus pandemic.

"We're starting to flatten the curve with our testing results," said Gov. Evers. "We want to take it to the next step, and that's what our 'Badger Bounce Back' plan is. It's around getting us to the point where we can start to open up various businesses in the state, and begin the slow transition back to getting us to a better place."

Evers said the state has adopted the White House and CDC's criteria to slow the spread of COVID-19.

TMJ4 News hosts 'Safer at Home' Virtual Town Hall

"It's going to be an all-out war on this sucker," said Gov. Evers said referring to COVID-19 in Wisconsin. "We need to make sure we get it to the point where we can start loosening up our requirements and move forward."

"Republicans want a seat at the table to work with Governor Evers," said Assembly Speaker Vos. "There's no Republican that I know that isn't taking the virus seriously. There's no Republican that I know that thinks we should just go back to normal tomorrow. We need to have a gradual roll-out, and we need to do it in a way that's really orderly."

Milwaukee County has the highest number of coronavirus cases and deaths in the state.

"We've made considerable progress," said Milwaukee Mayor Tom Barrett. "Now is not the time to take our foot off the gas. I think this is the time to do everything we can to flatten the curve and squash it altogether, so we don't face this lingering over the summer and the fall."

You can watch the full town hall in the video above.

9:00 p.m. -- Long-term care resident frustrated facility hasn't shared information about seven coronavirus deaths

There have been seven coronavirus deaths at one long-term care facility on Milwaukee's northwest side, according to medical examiner reports.

A BRIA of Trinity Village resident said Thursday that she had no idea any of her fellow residents have died from coronavirus until TMJ4 News brought it to her attention. She believes residents have the right to know.

People who live in long-term care facilities are particularly vulnerable to COVID-19 complications, but at BRIA of Trinity Village, there's an alarming trend. Seven residents have died from the virus, and medical examiner reports show six of them died within the past week and a half.

"Fear, inadequacy," said resident Catherine Crockett. "Something's going on and a little bit of anger that we don't know about it."

Crockett lives at BRIA of Trinity Village's independent living center. She can't believe staff or management hasn't informed residents of the outbreak.

BRIA Health Services CEO Daniel Weiss provided TMJ4 News with a statement that reads in part, "The BRIA family mourns the loss of those taken by COVID-19…. We are doing everything we can to stop the spread of COVID-19 within our facility, strictly adhering to all guidance from the CDC…"

Medical examiner reports show 44 residents of long-term care facilities across Milwaukee County have died from COVID-19 complications. That's 30% of the total 144 coronavirus deaths county-wide as of April 23.

"We're very concerned," said Greenfield Health Department Director Darren Rausch.

Rausch is on Milwaukee County's coronavirus response team. He said the county has sent out several recommendations to long-term care facilities to stop the spread.

"Those aggressive measures very early on, for many of us several weeks ago, limited the number of cases, but it certainly isn't going to take care of all of them as we can see," Rausch said Thursday.

Since Crockett is in independent living, she has fewer restrictions than those in assisted living, allowing her to still go outside for fresh air.

"Everybody I see now has a mask, but for a long time, we were without masks," she said.

Crockett said she now plans to demand answers about cases and deaths at her facility.

"Perhaps they don't want to scare the residents, but I think truth should prevail regardless," she said.

7:37 p.m. -- Wisconsin residents get medical debt dismissed amid pandemic

Blanche Jordan was surprised on March 29 when a process server appeared at her door in the middle of a pandemic to serve her with a $7,150 medical debt lawsuit.

The breast cancer survivor and assisted living facility caregiver was equally surprised on April 15 to learn the suit was dismissed.

“Shut the front door!” Jordan told a reporter who relayed news by phone that Milwaukee’s Froedtert Memorial Lutheran Hospital dropped its lawsuit against her. The bills were from a hysterectomy related to her cancer treatment. The suit was officially dismissed on April 13, court records show.

A Wisconsin Watch/WPR analysis published April 1 found that Wisconsin hospitals sued at least 104 patients over medical debt in small claims court since March 12, when Gov. Tony Evers declared a public health emergency to fight coronavirus. Froedtert Hospital filed 46 of those suits, including 18 cases filed after March 18 when a Froedtert spokesman said the hospital had suspended filing small claims suits during the pandemic.

___

The nonprofit news outlet Wisconsin Watch provided this article to The Associated Press through a collaboration with Institute for Nonprofit News.

7:25 p.m. -- 'God is good': Racine woman beats coronavirus after spending 10 days on a ventilator

After spending twenty days at Ascension All Saints Hospital, Darcell Belcher is thankful to head home.

The 62-year-old was diagnosed with COVID-19 on April 3rd and was eventually put on a ventilator fighting for her life. Thursday morning, she received a hero's goodbye as she was discharged from the hospital. Staff members lined the inside of the lobby, clapped, and cheered for Darcell as she was wheeled out to her daughter's car. Outside, she was greeted by her loved ones and friends. They held balloons and a sign that said Jesus heals.

"God is good. God is good; that's all I can say," said Darcell.

6:50 p.m. -- 'Safer at Home' protest at Wisconsin Capitol to go on as planned Friday

People planning to rally Friday against Wisconsin's "Safer at Home" order say they will proceed, even though their permit to hold it on Capitol grounds, was denied.

Similar to the rally in Brookfield last Saturday, the one scheduled in Madison is expected to be much bigger. It has the potential to be the largest to date in Wisconsin, with more than 3,300 people saying on Facebook that they're going. At least 12,000 more people say they're interested in going.

TMJ4 News has learned that some protestors are planning to stay in their cars for a "drive-in" rally. They'll circle the streets surrounding the Capitol. Still, many plan to get out of their vehicles for a more traditional protest.

"I'm just trying to make sure that we uphold the constitution, and to have our rights protected as Americans," said one mother from Oak Creek who plans to be in Madison for the protest, but did not want to share her name. "Based on information all of us have, we should be able to make our own choice about whether to stay at home or still work or have visitors. Those who are at a higher risk can continue to chose to stay at home. We should have an option, rather been told what we can and cannot do."

During a COVID-19 update Thursday, Governor Tony Evers implored protestors to keep a safe distance apart.

"Using the first amendment to express yourself and voice your opinion is quite sacred, but I don't think that should prevent people from using common sense," he said. "You might not have symptoms, but you could affect someone else. I don't think you'll see Capitol police or other law officers out there with yardsticks making sure people are staying six feet apart. At the end of the day, people must be responsible and make those decisions."

6:24 p.m. -- Wisconsin Department of Workforce Development answers your questions on unemployment benefits

The Department of Workforce Development (DWD) participated in a live question and answer session on TMJ4's Facebook Live Thursday afternoon, explaining some of the most pressing issues people have regarding unemployment.

"Even in 2008, we didn't have half of the unemployment claims throughout the whole great recession," Emily Savard with the DWD said.

Savard says there are over 440,000 Wisconsinites who have filed for unemployment, and their system is overwhelmed with people trying to get questions answered.

More than 500 comments came in during the Facebook Live, with many revolving around just getting in touch with the DWD. Many complained about waiting for hours on the phone to get through with no luck. Savard says they understand the frustration and are adding more help.

"We have borrowed over 100 people within the DWD and trained them to work within unemployment," Savard said. "We're currently hiring about 200 staff to come on board, and we're also looking at hiring hundreds of staff in an additional call center to specifically deal with calls and get some other issues taken care of."

Before picking up the phone, though, Savard suggests going to the Department of Workforce Development website, where many questions can be answered.

"Our phone lines continue to be overwhelmed with calls," Savard said. "The phone should not be somebody's first means of simply gathering information. We would love if the phones are reserved for people who cannot find an answer after looking themselves or if people are told to call in."

Facebook Live had many other questions, ranging from simple to complex. Like simple mistakes, people make that could hold up their claim is processed.

"People are asking if I filed for regular unemployment and haven't heard, should I apply for pandemic unemployment at the same time to get those two things rolling at once," Savard said. "The answer is no. Pandemic unemployment assistance is only for people who do not qualify for regular unemployment insurance. If you had those two applications going, that will create more of a workload, and it will slow things down."

When it comes to receiving money, Savard says it's essential to continue filing every week, and people will receive back pay for the weeks they were approved. She also says the $600 from the federal pandemic unemployment compensation should be coming soon.

"We are in the process of programming that right now and anticipate paying that money next week," Savard said. "No matter the eligibility on a weekly basis, they get an additional $600 on top of that. Every week they would get that additional $600 on top of a weekly benefit rate."

If you were laid off, furloughed or terminated, keep in mind, any vacation time you've accrued is owed to you.

"It depends on the employer, but generally, if you do have accrued paid time off, vacation or other benefits, you haven't used up for the period yet, you should be paid those out as well," Attorney Samantha Huddleston said.

If you have questions that weren't answered in the Facebook Live, please email news@tmj4.com, and we'll try to get you an answer to help you rebound.

5:53 p.m. -- Milwaukee police chief opens up about policing challenges, enforcing 'Safer at Home' order

Milwaukee Police Chief Alfonzo Morales said a lot is on the department's place as they navigate further into the COVID-19 pandemic.

Morales spoke with members of the press during a "Newsmaker Lunch Hour" Thursday held by the Milwaukee Press Club.

TMJ4 News' Tony Atkins was one of three journalists on the panel, asking several questions.

The police chief said he's happy to spend more time with his family. However, much of his time at home is spent thinking of ways to deal with ongoing challenges.

Morales told the panel dozens of promotions are on hold, thanks in-part to COVID-19.

"I have not had one promotional process yet with these positions," Morales said.

Chief Morales said they currently deal with about 60 COVID-19-related business calls daily. Those include alleged violations of Governor Evers' Stay at Home order.

"We've had over 300 business checks that were related to the pandemic where we had to take some type of actions," Morales said while remaining empathetic to those struggling businesses. "I feel bad for them. Some businesses just opened up, and some businesses are going to close because of this, but we have a job to do."

Morales was asked about recent protesting in Brookfield, where hundreds gathered to re-open the economy, despite the order.

The chief said he's pushing to get messaging out about the order before giving citations or making arrests.

"It's going to be a tough decision. We're going to start off with messaging. We're going to go through the steps, but if it merits, arrests will be made," Morales said.

The Milwaukee Common Council approved increased penalties for those caught violating the order earlier this week.

Fines would go up to $500 if given.

5:17 p.m. -- Kenosha County Sheriff sends open letter, urges other sheriffs to support 'Safer at Home' order

Kenosha County Sheriff David Beth has sent an open letter to sheriffs across the state of Wisconsin. He's urging them to think twice about any decision they make not to support the Gov. Evers' "Safer at Home" order. He believes these decisions are best made at the federal and state level.

"I'm not a doctor, scientist, or a constitutional attorney, and I don't play one on TV," Sheriff Beth writes in the open letter. "I rely on my governor, my health division, and my corporation counsel to advise me in times like this."

Sheriff Beth says he has received phone calls and emails from people who live in Kenosha County who are upset with him enforcing the order, adding he wished he was not being placed into this position.

Some sheriffs, including Racine County Sheriff Christopher Schmaling, have said they would not enforce the order. While Schmaling recommends people continue to follow social distancing guidelines and use personal protective equipment, he writes that "state law does not have the power to supersede or suspend the Constitutional rights of American citizens."

The governor's order is set to last until May 26.

3:24 p.m. -- Democrats expect 'in-person convention' in Milwaukee, party chairman says

Democratic Party chairman Tom Perez says he expects to hold an in-person convention in Milwaukee to nominate Joe Biden for president, though he didn't rule out the potential that portions of the event would be conducted virtually.

The convention is slated for the week of Aug. 17. It was postponed from July 13-16 amid the coronavirus pandemic.

Perez told reporters on a telephone call Thursday that they are planning for an in-person convention, but "at the same time, we do not put our public health heads in the sand."

Biden has been more circumspect, stating that the convention might have to be entirely virtual.

2:54 p.m. -- Fourth nun dies of COVID-19 complications at Greenfield convent

A fourth death has been reported at a Greenfield convent where nuns have tested positive for COVID-19.

Sister Annelda Holtkamp passed away on April 19, according to an online obituary. She was 102 years old.

She is "survived by her sister Renelda Pieper of Houghton, IA and the School Sisters of St. Francis Community with whom she shared life for 77 years," the obituary says.

A private mass of burial will be held Friday, April 24. In lieu of flowers, the obituary says contributions to the School Sisters of St. Francis are appreciated.

"Our Lady of the Angels is a co-sponsored ministry of the School Sisters of Notre Dame and the School Sisters of St. Francis. It is a state-of-the-art home for retired sisters of both communities and offers specialized memory care," said the School Sisters of Notre Dame Central Pacific Province. "We are grateful for the hard work, care and compassion our sisters receive at Our Lady of the Angels. The School Sisters of Notre Dame continue to pray for all who are impacted by COVID-19, especially our sisters, their families and those caring for our sisters."

Three other nuns at the same convent have also died from complications related to COVID-19. Sister Mary Regine Collins died on April 6, Sister Marie June Skender died on April 7, and Sister Mary Francele Sherburne died on April 9.

The School Sisters of St. Francis and the School Sisters of Notre Dame both live at the Our Lady of the Angels convent in Greenfield.

11:59 a.m. -- Black Arts Fest MKE cancels festival amid COVID-19 concerns

Black Arts Fest MKE has canceled its August 1 festival amid concerns from the coronavirus pandemic.

The festival was supposed to take place at the Henry Maier festival grounds. The decision came after "careful consideration of the mounting health concerns and community hardships arising from the COVID-19 pandemic."

“We appreciate the value of our annual gathering but prioritize our community’s health and safety above all else,” said Derek Tyus, chairman of BAFMKE’s board of directors.

The Black Arts Fest MKE plans to return to Henry Maier Festival Park in August 2021.

Other events also canceled their plans for the summer, including the Milwaukee Pride Parade, Bastille Day and Jazz in the Park.

11:16 a.m. -- Bastille Days, Jazz in the Park among events postponed by East Town Association due to coronavirus

Bastille Days and Jazz in the Park will not happen on their original dates, the East Town Association announced Thursday.

The organization has decided not to host any events in June or July. It hopes to eventually reschedule all of its planned activities, including the French-themed Bastille Days and popular concert series Jazz in the Park. The Saturday morning Cathedral Square Market will also be postponed.

"The health and welfare of the community is our number one priority and we will do our part to keep the best interests of our attendees and vendors in mind," the organization said in a news release.

One silver lining? You can soon sign up for the Virtual Madison Medical Affiliates Storm the Bastille run on July 9-12. The $25 registration fee includes a run bib and a long sleeve t-shirt. Participants will be encouraged to track and record their times digitally.

Head to the East Town Association's website for more information.

10:17 a.m. -- Milwaukee Pride Parade canceled due to coronavirus concerns

Milwaukee's Pride Parade has been canceled due to the coronavirus pandemic.

Parade organizers said that the 2020 Milwaukee Pride Parade scheduled for June 7 was canceled due to coronavirus concerns.

This will be the first time the parade hasn't been held since it began in 2005.

“We hope that the Milwaukee Pride Parade will be back and better than ever next summer, and we cannot wait to once gather together with our community,” says parade organizers.

Registered entrants will be provided refunds.

No date has been set yet for 2021.

9:41 a.m. -- Eddie Martini's gives back to health care community

A well known fine dining experience in Wauwatosa, Eddie Martini's, sits empty.

"That is not the goal for someone in the restaurant business. It has affected us like so many other people in the entire world. To where we have not had to let anyone go but we are counting down the minutes until we can reopen," says Chris Murphy, owner of Eddie Martini's.

Rolling with the punches, Chris has done whatever he can to keep his staff safe and customers coming back for more.

Eddie Martini's gives back to health care community

"It's a skeleton crew but we are trying to rotate through that and keep in touch with as many people that we can," says Chris. "The number one seller for us is the beef stroganoff. It's comforting, it has dessert, salad and it's leftovers and that is striking a chord."

For daily curbside menus and ways to donate to Eddie Cares, check out Eddie Martini's on Facebook.

Read the full story here.

8:32 a.m. -- Want to hang out with Aaron Rodgers? Here's how you can help the All In Challenge

If you've ever dreamed about hanging out with Aaron Rodgers for a day, now's your chance.

Rodgers is teaming up with the All In Challenge Foundation, a foundation that is raising money for Feeding America, Meal On Wheels, World Central Kitchen and No Kid Hungry.

The foundation is letting fans bid on a chance to tour Lambeau field with Rodgers, the Green Bay Packers locker room and a chance to watch a game with all-access field passes. The lucky bidder will also get Rodgers' jersey after the game.

The starting bid for the package was $10,000. As of Thursday morning, the current bid was at $48,000.

To learn more about the challenge and bid, click here.

Wednesday, April 22

10:22 p.m. -- Recovered COVID-19 patient has tough time donating blood plasma with life-saving antibodies

A local coronavirus survivor is hoping to help other patients by donating his blood plasma to patients in need.

Jeff Kluever was one of the first COVID-19 cases in the Milwaukee area and has since recovered. Research shows the plasma from recovered patients can be used to help those currently sick with the virus in the hospital.

Kluever believes he contracted the virus while on a ski trip to Austria with five friends. They all were diagnosed with COVID-19 when they were tested in the U.S. in early March. Jeff's test was on March 9th, his confirmed diagnosis on the 11th. Then after self-quarantine, his doctor gave him the all-clear on March 21st.

To donate plasma, the Versiti Blood Center says patients need two things. A positive COVID-19 diagnosis, which Jeff had, and 28 days free of symptoms, which he had as well. But five different coronavirus tests still showed he had the virus. It wasn't until today that his tests came back clear, and he was free to donate plasma.

Versiti Blood Center's Chief Medical Officer Dr. Thomas Adshire, M.D. says Jeff's testing scenario is now becoming more common.

"That's pretty consistent with what we are now finding, that it is taking people longer to get rid of the virus," says Dr. Adshire.

Doctors are hoping that the natural antibodies now in recovered patients' blood will help those that are sick in the hospital with the virus.

9:38 p.m. -- Wisconsin DWD answers questions you asked about unemployment benefits

Dozens of people have reached out to us at TMJ4 News to ask for help when it comes to the unemployment benefits process.

Many say they are stuck in the "pending" phase when it comes to getting their checks.

"It feels pretty frustrating because there is no reason," said Anna Marquardt.

The mother of two is on week number five, waiting for her benefits. Marquardt continues to see a "pending" status every time she checks her application.

We reached out to the Department of Workforce Development, and Emily Savard, Program and Policy Analyst with the Unemployment Division, answered some of your questions.

Watch the full interview with Emily Savard below as she answers some more questions on unemployment benefits.

7:35 p.m. -- State COVID-19 relief package makes workers' comp harder to get for first responders

First responders like EMTs, police officers, and firefighters run into dangerous situations every day during this pandemic.

Still, a clause in the state's COVID-19 relief package makes it harder for them to file for workers' compensation if they get sick while on the job.

The relief package, adopted by Gov. Tony Evers last week, stipulates that if first responders contract COVID-19 on the job, they have to prove what call they got it to access the benefits, something the heads of their unions say is an unreasonable requirement.

Marc Cohen, the executive director of the Wisconsin EMT association, and Mahlon Mitchell, the head of the Professional Fire Fighters of Wisconsin, are pushing lawmakers and state leaders to change the infant law.

"These are front line folks just like doctors and nurses and healthcare workers across the state and firefighters, and law enforcement and EMS shouldn't be subjected to extraordinary measures," Cohen said.

7:20 p.m. -- DHS starts reporting COVID-19 cases in long-term care facilities

Concerns about COVID-19 and nursing homes are mounting in southeast Wisconsin and across the country.

Long-term care facilities have increased restrictions to keep senior citizens safe from the virus.

Sadly, people are still contracting the virus and sometimes dying.

"Since long-term care facilities are primarily home to our senior members of our community. They are a particular place where risk of infection is high," said Deputy Secretary Julie Willems Van Dijk with the Wisconsin Department of Health Services.

Milwaukee County Medical Examiner reports show four COVID related deaths tied to an address at the Allis Care Center in West Allis and four more here at Bria of Trinity Village in Milwaukee.

6:49 p.m. -- Some nonessential businesses ready to reopen, others say they won't even if it's allowed

Some businesses deemed nonessential are eager to reopen while others say they won't fully resume operations even if the Wisconsin Supreme Court overturns the Safer at Home order extension.

The drive-thru was busy for fish fry Wednesday at The Packing House on Milwaukee's south side, but the dining room and bar have been empty for more than a month. That's how General Manager Chris Wiken intends to keep it.

"We're still seeing new cases," Wiken said. "I think we really need to eradicate this virus as quickly as possible so we can get back to that."

Wiken said he sadly had to lay off 90-percent of his employees, but he believes public health is more important than making money during this coronavirus pandemic.

"Believe me, we miss being open," he said. "We miss having our dining rooms full and our bar full, but now is not the time to even be considering that."

The state legislature is suing Wisconsin's Department of Health Services, alleging it abused its authority by forcing nonessential businesses to close. UW-Milwaukee political professor Mordecai Lee believes the legislature will prevail.

"Absolutely and look at the timing," Lee said. "The timing is while the incumbent who lost is still on, and he'll, of course, participate."

Assembly Speaker Robin Vos told WTMJ Radio Wednesday morning that if republicans win, reopening businesses will still come with a phased approach.

"Winning the lawsuit means we win the ability to negotiate and try to put together a plan that everyone can support as opposed to the process {Governor Evers} is using now," Vos said.

6:09 p.m. -- Wauwatosa couple of 73 years dies six hours apart after contracting COVID-19

Mary and Wilford Kepler were together for 73 years. Through sickness and health. However, death would only part them for six hours.

Both died from COVID-19 related complications Saturday.

"Our family lost the glue that holds us together," said granddaughter Natalie Lameka.

The couple was key in keeping the tight-knit family together. However, their bond with one another grew stronger each of their 73-years together and they knew it.

"It was definitely hard. but it was bittersweet," Lameka said.

The family doesn't know how the couple contracted COVID-19. Mary and Wilford were taken to Froedtert Hospital after finding out.

Mary died six hours after Wilford.

6:02 p.m. -- Local baker brings joy to healthcare workers, one cookie at a time

Something as small as a cookie is enough to brighten a person's day. That's what Adija Smith, owner of Confectionately Yours, believes.

Although her business is closed due to COVID-19, she is still baking up a storm and delivering cookies all across Milwaukee.

"This is a tragedy for the nation, and if I can do something as small as a cookie to put a smile on, I was willing to do it," said Adija.

Adija has delivered more than 2,000 cookies to healthcare workers across the city. She said it's a mission that started close to her heart, when her best friend's husband, Toran Govan, was diagnosed with COVID-19.

"Over the last week we have seen a change in his health to where the doctor's counted him out, and he is now able to talk and walk and making a full recovery," said Adija.

After hearing about the amazing medical staff, Adija and her team decided to use their talents to honor them.

"We are so much stronger together as a nation than we are apart. This pandemic, this situation doesn't discriminate against race, age religion. It impacts everybody, and if we would just come together and be on one accord, we will get through it," said Adija.

For four weeks, she has delivered cookies to area hospitals. Doctors, nurses, and staff have thanked her for her kindness.

"As long as I have the ability to do this, I am going to keep baking cookies and keep handing them out," said Adija.

Adija said it's something small, but she hopes it's enough to brighten their day.

"I'm going to bake somebody happy," said Adija.

To support Adija's mission to provide healthcare workers with cookies, you can email her at confectionatelyyoursggg@gmail.com.

Cashapp. $CY3G
Or by mail
Confectionately Yours
3536 W Fond Du Lac Ave #112
Milwaukee, WI 53216

5:38 p.m. -- Residents share thoughts on Gov. Evers' extended Safer at Home order

As state lawmakers debate on the most responsible way to re-open Wisconsin, area residents are sharing their opinions as well.

Chuck Cruz, who TMJ4 caught up without outside of a local coffee shop in Milwaukee's Riverwest neighborhood, said he understands the impact Wisconsin's "Safer at Home" order is having on nearby businesses. But, he still believes the governor made the right call by extending the order until May 26.

"What good would it be if the businesses open and then we have a re-surge of the virus?" asked Cruz.

Susan Hansen, a small business owner herself, is doing her best to support the businesses that are still open and she agrees that the governor is doing the right thing by following the advice of health experts.

"I don’t think its time for all of us to decide we know better than the medical professionals who have the expertise and who are all putting their lives on the line," said Hansen.

Residents share their opinions of Governor's extended "safer-at-home" order

But, not everybody agrees with Evers' decision. Some believe its time to lift the executive order and to open all small businesses again.

Ian Scott, who owns a small business in West Allis, said he fears financial relief packages won't be enough to save small businesses that have been shut down during the coronavirus pandemic.

"For some of these bars and restaurants and things like that, it doesn’t do enough to get them through to the other side," said Scott.

He believes it should be up to individuals, not the government, to protect themselves and others from the spread of Coronavirus.

"If you’re worried about it, stay home. But, there's certainly several businesses that do need to open back up," he said.

The Republican-led legislature has filed a lawsuit saying the extension of the state's Safer at Home order is an abuse of executive powers.

The state's Supreme Court has not determined if the case will be heard. Governor Tony Evers has until Tuesday to reply to the filing.

4:17 p.m. -- Nearly 150 virus cases tied to Green Bay plant

Nearly 150 employees and family members of workers at the JBS Packerland meatpacking plant in Green Bay have tested positive for the coronavirus, the Brown County Health Department said Wednesday.

In addition to the 147 cases tied to that plant, county health officials said there were another 39 cases tied to American Foods Group and 19 to sausage maker Salm Partners in nearby Denmark.

All of the plants remain open. Meatpacking facilities in other states that have seen spikes in cases have shut down.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention was helping to investigate the outbreak in Green Bay.

The cluster of cases tied to JBS appears to be the largest of its kind in Wisconsin.

More than half of the 402 confirmed coronavirus cases in Brown County are linked to food processing plants. Brown County is the fourth most populated county in the state but it now has the second-highest number of cases, jumping ahead of Dane County but behind Milwaukee County.

2:18 p.m. -- Wisconsin National Guard members have COVID symptoms after election

Fifteen people in Wisconsin have tested positive for the coronavirus after having voted in-person in the April 7 election or after having worked at the polls, a state health official said Wednesday.

Also, five Wisconsin National Guard members who helped staff polls on election day have reported symptoms of COVID-19 but the one who was tested came back as negative, said Maj. Gen. Paul Knapp.

Wisconsin Department of Health Services Deputy Secretary Julie Willems Van Dijk said despite 15 people who were at the polls on election day testing positive, the state can't say whether they became infected at the polls.

“We have correlation, they voted and were at the polls, but we don’t have causation," she said.

Milwaukee health officials have previously said they identified seven people who were at the polls who tested positive for COVID-19, but it was also too early to say whether they contracted the virus there. It wasn't clear whether the 15 cases mentioned on Wednesday included the seven Milwaukee cases.

Health officials had said ahead of the April 7 election they were concerned about a spike in cornavirus cases due to in-person voting. Those concerns were heightened after voters had to wait in line for hours in close proximity at polling sites in Milwaukee and Green Bay.

1:34 p.m. -- 19 COVID-19 cases report connection to in-person voting, Department of Health Services says

The Department of Health Services has reported that 19 individuals who have tested positive for coronavirus after April 9 either voted in-person, or worked the polls.

The Spring Election took place as scheduled on April 7 after efforts from Gov. Tony Evers to postpone it amid the coronavirus pandemic.

People stood 6-feet apart in long lines wearing proper pandemic attire, gloves and masks. Now, 19 individuals who report attending in-person voting are COVID-19 positive.

However, DHS says that several of the 19 reported other possible exposures as well.

“Public health officials continue to interview people who have tested positive with COVID-19 and query whether someone has reported voting in person or working at the polls. Since we only have data on positive cases (without a comparison group of people who were not tested or tested negative), there is no way to know with certainty if any exposures at the polls that are reported are in fact attributable to COVID-19 illness,” said The Wisconsin Department of Health Services.

Currently, 230 people have died from coronavirus in Wisconsin.

12:27 p.m. -- 103 inmates test positive for COVID-19 at Milwaukee County House of Corrections

Over 100 inmates have tested positive for COVID-19 at the Milwaukee County House of Corrections.

As of Tuesday, 103 House of Corrections inmates were confirmed to have coronavirus, while 22 people tested negative and 10 have recovered.

Only one person is confirmed to have the virus in the Milwaukee County Jail, but there are 90 cases still pending.

Of those who tested positive are four employees at the House of Corrections and one at the county jail.

There are currently no cases in the Milwaukee County Youth Detention.

The county says they have implemented changes in the facility to help slow the spread of COVID-19. Those changes include:

  • Allowing single-occupant cells at the jail
  • Limiting new jail admissions - no standalone misdemeanor arrests will result in the immediate transfer of individuals to the local county jail
  • Cleaning and sanitizing dorms at the House of Corrections three times per day, instead of only once as it was before the pandemic
  • Screening every youth who comes to the Division of Youth and Family Services by taking their temperature
  • Placing inmates who have tested positive or who are symptomatic in quarantine dorms at the House of Corrections

For more information, visit the county website.

11:55 a.m. -- Eight Milwaukee County golf courses scheduled to reopen April 24

MILWAUKEE COUNTY — Eight Milwaukee County golf courses are now booking tee-times for their courses set to reopen on Friday.

Milwaukee County Parks said that Brown Deer Park, Dretzka Park, Oakwood Park, Whitnall Park, Currie Park, Grant Park Greenfield Park and Lincoln Park were opening April 24.

Golf courses were initially closed as a part of Gov. Tony Evers' Safer at Home order that was began on March 25. The original order was set to expire on April 24, but Evers extended it to May 26. The extended order allowed for several changes, including the reopening of golf courses.

With the reopening of golf courses, Milwaukee County Parks said golfers will see a few changes on the green including:

  • Golf will be walking only, no motor carts. A limited number of push carts will be available for rental.
  • Pro-shops and restaurants will remain closed, so food & beverage will not be available for purchase.
  • Clubhouse bathrooms will be available
  • Golfers must stay a minimum of six feet from other golfers, unless you're from the same household.
  • Congregating will not be permitted in the parking lot before or after golf.
  • No ball washers, rakes or trash cans will be on the course, so please don’t bring carry-in food or drink and take any trash with you to dispose of at home.
  • Cups have been raised, to eliminate the need to remove the ball from the hole, and flags will stay in cups
  • Scorecards and pencils will be available on request from the starter, or you can track your score with an app like 18birdies.
  • Golf lessons will be not available.

Tee-times will also need to be booked in advance. Walk on players will not be permitted.
To sign up, click here.

11:37 a.m. -- Milwaukee police officers soldier on amidst COVID-19 pandemic

Stay at Home orders from the state and the City of Milwaukee remain in effect as public officials fight the spread of COVID-19.

The virus has pushed many first responders into new and uncharted territory.

But so far, it's been business as usual for Milwaukee police officers.

Milwaukee police officers soldier on amidst COVID-19 pandemic

Capt. Willie Murphy, a 24-year Milwaukee police veteran, said the department has of course been forced to adapt to social distancing recommendations.

"The public is going to see us wearing masks and gloves while interacting with them," Murphy said. "They're going to see us asking people to step outside of their homes to have conversations with us, to maintain that social distancing."

Murphy added that, while officers never trained for COVID-19 specifically, the Milwaukee Police Department's training guidelines stress the importance of being able to adapt to new and, at times, unknown challenges.

"As officers, we always have to operate in situations that involve a lot of risks and unknowns," Murphy said.

"The human side of us, of course we don't want to contract COVID-19, we don't want to take it home to our families. But we have a duty to serve and protect," Murphy said. "This is a serious health pandemic, but it doesn't change the fundamental duties of law enforcement."

Read the full story here.

10:58 a.m. -- Wisconsin virus order protesters vow to rally without permit

MADISON, Wis. (AP) — Organizers of a rally against Wisconsin’s stay-at-home order say they're proceeding with the event on Friday even though their permit to hold it on the grounds of the state Capitol has been denied.

The planned rally is the latest in a string of events in Wisconsin and elsewhere organized by opponents of orders designed to limit the spread of the coronavirus.

Organizer Madison Elmer said she learned this week that the permit was denied because the gathering would be in violation of the current order barring gatherings of any size. Elmer pledged Wednesday to forge ahead with the protest.

10:21 a.m. -- Wisconsin Republicans delay state convention

The Wisconsin Republican Party is pushing back its state convention to July, even as state GOP leaders are trying to overturn a stay-at-home order that runs until May 26.

Republicans had originally scheduled their state convention for May 15 and May 16 at a water park in Wisconsin Dells. The convention has now been delayed until July 10.

Andrew Hitt, chairman of the state party, said Wednesday that delaying the convention was a timing issue.

“Even if the the current restrictions expired sometime in May, we would not have the desired amount of time for a successful convention,” Hitt said in an email.

Republican legislative leaders on Tuesday asked the state Supreme Court to block an order from Democratic Gov. Tony Evers' health secretary to continue the stay-at-home order requiring most nonessential businesses to be closed until May 26. The original order was scheduled to expire on Friday.

Republicans bringing the lawsuit argue that the state health secretary overstepped her authority with the order, which they say will devastate the economy and leave Wisconsin “in shambles.” Evers accused Republicans of putting people's health at risk.

9:30 a.m. -- Tosa vet clinic offers 'paw-side pick up' services amid pandemic

Staying safe at home is always easier when you have a four-legged friend around. But if your little guy or girl gets in trouble and needs some medical attention, East Tosa Vet Clinic is open.
"We are having our clients wait in the car while we do their pet's appointments. Then handling the majority of client communication like payments over the phone," says Kerry Malak, director of client services at Wauwatosa Veterinary Clinics.
"We are having our clients wait in the car while we do their pet's appointments. Then handling the majority of client communication like payments over the phone," says Kerry Malak, director of client services at Wauwatosa Veterinary Clinics.
You could call it "paw-side" pickup, and even those with a little separation anxiety have done well with the changes.
You could call it "paw-side" pickup, and even those with a little separation anxiety have done well with the changes.
"The majority of our clients have been so understanding and supportive through all of this and appreciate that we are doing all we can to keep the humans safe and still be open and being able to be here for the pets," says Kerry.
"The majority of our clients have been so understanding and supportive through all of this and appreciate that we are doing all we can to keep the humans safe and still be open and being able to be here for the pets," says Kerry.
With two locations in Wauwatosa, these animal specialists have taken social distancing to a whole new level.
With two locations in Wauwatosa, these animal specialists have taken social distancing to a whole new level.

Local vet clinic offers 'paw-side pick up' services amid pandemic

"One of the first things we did was was break up our staff into three different teams so that we are having minimal crossover between staff," says Kerry.
"One of the first things we did was was break up our staff into three different teams so that we are having minimal crossover between staff," says Kerry.
For those who have no problem never leaving the couch, virtual house calls.
For those who have no problem never leaving the couch, virtual house calls.
"Doing some video calls at times and accommodating people as much as we need to to make sure they are comfortable with the situation and know that their pets are getting the best care," says Kerry.
"Doing some video calls at times and accommodating people as much as we need to to make sure they are comfortable with the situation and know that their pets are getting the best care," says Kerry.
The best thing Kerry and her team did is take in new clients. New clients who recently found their forever home thanks to families stepping up.
The best thing Kerry and her team did is take in new clients. New clients who recently found their forever home thanks to families stepping up.
"One of the things we love about Wauwatosa is that it is such a pet-friendly community. So we love seeing all these new family members coming into the household and knowing everyone stepped up so much for the Humane Society to foster and adopt to make sure everyone has a home during this period has been amazing," says Kerry.
"One of the things we love about Wauwatosa is that it is such a pet-friendly community. So we love seeing all these new family members coming into the household and knowing everyone stepped up so much for the Humane Society to foster and adopt to make sure everyone has a home during this period has been amazing," says Kerry.
East Tosa Vet Clinic is open Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, and Friday from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.
East Tosa Vet Clinic is open Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, and Friday from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.

Tuesday, April 21
Tuesday, April 21
10:00 p.m. -- Down to their last dollars, Shorewood small business owner waits for relief checks to come
10:00 p.m. -- Down to their last dollars, Shorewood small business owner waits for relief checks to come
Despite a promise of checks for those left unemployed, many have not seen relief from the government.
Despite a promise of checks for those left unemployed, many have not seen relief from the government.
A Shorewood small business owner and mother says she has less than $200 in her checking account and no idea when any more money will be coming in.
A Shorewood small business owner and mother says she has less than $200 in her checking account and no idea when any more money will be coming in.
"I have $139, yep, that's where I'm at in my checking account," said Caroline Kreitlow, owner of Luxe The Salon.
"I have $139, yep, that's where I'm at in my checking account," said Caroline Kreitlow, owner of Luxe The Salon.
Her salon has been shut down since before the Safer at Home order went into effect because salons were told to close earlier. She is now on her fifth week trying to get unemployment benefits.
Her salon has been shut down since before the Safer at Home order went into effect because salons were told to close earlier. She is now on her fifth week trying to get unemployment benefits.
"By week three, my status kept showing as pending. So weeks three, four, and five are now showing as pending," said Kreitlow.
"By week three, my status kept showing as pending. So weeks three, four, and five are now showing as pending," said Kreitlow.
Kreitlow is not pushing to stop the Safer at Home Order. Her sister battled coronavirus and ended up hospitalized for five days last month. She believes people need to stay home, but she needs help to do it.
Kreitlow is not pushing to stop the Safer at Home Order. Her sister battled coronavirus and ended up hospitalized for five days last month. She believes people need to stay home, but she needs help to do it.
And Caroline is not in her wait for benefits. On TMJ4 News' Facebook page, we asked people who are unemployed if they have received their unemployment checks.
And Caroline is not in her wait for benefits. On TMJ4 News' Facebook page, we asked people who are unemployed if they have received their unemployment checks.
9:44 p.m. -- Lawmakers react to Wisconsin legislature's legal filing to stop Gov. Evers' 'Safer at Home' order
9:44 p.m. -- Lawmakers react to Wisconsin legislature's legal filing to stop Gov. Evers' 'Safer at Home' order
The Wisconsin legislature has sued to stop the Evers administration's "Safer at Home" order extension.
The Wisconsin legislature has sued to stop the Evers administration's "Safer at Home" order extension.
In a 70-page document filed Tuesday, the Emergency Motion for Temporary Injunction lays out what the Republican-led legislature says is an abuse of power from the Department of Health Services (DHS) Secretary-Designee Andrea Palm. The governor's extension of his original order is based on DHS statutes.
In a 70-page document filed Tuesday, the Emergency Motion for Temporary Injunction lays out what the Republican-led legislature says is an abuse of power from the Department of Health Services (DHS) Secretary-Designee Andrea Palm. The governor's extension of his original order is based on DHS statutes.
Speaker Robin Vos (R-Rochester) and Senate Majority Leader Scott Fitzgerald (R-Juneau) said in a statement released Tuesday: "The public outcry over the Safer at Home order continues to increase as positive COVID cases decrease or remain flat. There's immense frustration regarding the extension, as it goes beyond the executive branch's statutory powers."
Speaker Robin Vos (R-Rochester) and Senate Majority Leader Scott Fitzgerald (R-Juneau) said in a statement released Tuesday: "The public outcry over the Safer at Home order continues to increase as positive COVID cases decrease or remain flat. There's immense frustration regarding the extension, as it goes beyond the executive branch's statutory powers."
Governor Tony Evers held a conference call with reporters after he had a chance to read the order. Evers said, "legislative republicans frankly have said to the people of Wisconsin, our political power is more important than your health."
Governor Tony Evers held a conference call with reporters after he had a chance to read the order. Evers said, "legislative republicans frankly have said to the people of Wisconsin, our political power is more important than your health."
Evers called the filing a "power grab" and criticized its lack of empathy for front line workers.
Evers called the filing a "power grab" and criticized its lack of empathy for front line workers.
"I've frankly read some horrible things in this state, but this lawsuit is something else. Not a single mention of saving lives not a single mention of protecting our first responders our nurses our doctors, our critical workers. Nothing," said Evers.
"I've frankly read some horrible things in this state, but this lawsuit is something else. Not a single mention of saving lives not a single mention of protecting our first responders our nurses our doctors, our critical workers. Nothing," said Evers.
9:31 p.m. -- Alliant Energy offering resources to help pay energy bills
9:31 p.m. -- Alliant Energy offering resources to help pay energy bills
If you need financial help with your energy bills, there are resources to help.
If you need financial help with your energy bills, there are resources to help.
Alliant Energy says due to COVID-19, the federal government has increased energy assistance funding to several programs, including LIHEAP (Low-Income Home Energy Assistance Program).
Alliant Energy says due to COVID-19, the federal government has increased energy assistance funding to several programs, including LIHEAP (Low-Income Home Energy Assistance Program).
Crisis funding is now available to income-qualified households. You can apply for crisis funding even if you have already applied for or received LIHEAP benefits.
Crisis funding is now available to income-qualified households. You can apply for crisis funding even if you have already applied for or received LIHEAP benefits.
Alliant Energy encourages customers to apply now because funds are limited.
Alliant Energy encourages customers to apply now because funds are limited.
For LIHEAP information including application deadlines and updated guidelines in Wisconsin, click here.
For LIHEAP information including application deadlines and updated guidelines in Wisconsin, click here.
The Hometown Care Energy Fund also helps income-qualified customers. Call 211 or contact your County Energy Assistance office for information.
The Hometown Care Energy Fund also helps income-qualified customers. Call 211 or contact your County Energy Assistance office for information.
You can learn more about all available resources by clicking here.
You can learn more about all available resources by clicking here.
9:15 p.m. -- Milwaukee Irish Fest, world's largest Irish music festival, canceled due to COVID-19 pandemic
9:15 p.m. -- Milwaukee Irish Fest, world's largest Irish music festival, canceled due to COVID-19 pandemic
The Milwaukee Irish Fest has been canceled due to the COVID-19 pandemic.
The Milwaukee Irish Fest has been canceled due to the COVID-19 pandemic.
The world's largest Irish music festival was scheduled to take place August 13-16 at the Henry Maier Festival Park on Milwaukee's lakefront.
The world's largest Irish music festival was scheduled to take place August 13-16 at the Henry Maier Festival Park on Milwaukee's lakefront.
"Based on the information we have been able to gleam up until this point, we feel it will be concerning for large group gatherings, such as our 100,000 plus attendees, to be able to come together safely in August," an organizer for the festival writes. "Your health and welfare are our number one priority, and we want to play our part in keeping everyone safe."
"Based on the information we have been able to gleam up until this point, we feel it will be concerning for large group gatherings, such as our 100,000 plus attendees, to be able to come together safely in August," an organizer for the festival writes. "Your health and welfare are our number one priority, and we want to play our part in keeping everyone safe."
If you already purchased a ticket for the festival, you will receive an email in the next few days, which will outline in more detail the options that will be available to you. You can either transfer your tickets to the 2021 festival, donate your ticket money back to Milwaukee Irish Fest to support them as a non-profit, or receive a refund for your tickets.
If you already purchased a ticket for the festival, you will receive an email in the next few days, which will outline in more detail the options that will be available to you. You can either transfer your tickets to the 2021 festival, donate your ticket money back to Milwaukee Irish Fest to support them as a non-profit, or receive a refund for your tickets.
Refunds will automatically be issued to anyone who purchased the Failte Club VIP Experience.
Refunds will automatically be issued to anyone who purchased the Failte Club VIP Experience.
Milwaukee Irish Fest plans to be back at Henry Maier Festival Park the third weekend in August (19-22) in 2021.
Milwaukee Irish Fest plans to be back at Henry Maier Festival Park the third weekend in August (19-22) in 2021.
8:30 p.m. -- VP Mike Pence says governors should work with the Trump administration to roll out COVID-19 testing
8:30 p.m. -- VP Mike Pence says governors should work with the Trump administration to roll out COVID-19 testing
The need for more coronavirus testing supplies grows by the day in Milwaukee and around the state.
The need for more coronavirus testing supplies grows by the day in Milwaukee and around the state.
Charles Benson asked Vice President Mike Pence why there isn't more testing as he toured a ventilator plant in Madison.
Charles Benson asked Vice President Mike Pence why there isn't more testing as he toured a ventilator plant in Madison.
Vice President Pence visited the GE Healthcare facility in Madison Tuesday, where they are making ventilators. They've already double capacity and expect to double capacity again by the end of June.
Vice President Pence visited the GE Healthcare facility in Madison Tuesday, where they are making ventilators. They've already double capacity and expect to double capacity again by the end of June.
"The fact that no American who has needed a ventilator has been denied a ventilator is a great accomplishment for our nation, and you all played a leading role in that," said Pence.
"The fact that no American who has needed a ventilator has been denied a ventilator is a great accomplishment for our nation, and you all played a leading role in that," said Pence.
The vice president says efforts by union workers here will help the country exceed the goal of creating 100,000 ventilators in 100 days.
The vice president says efforts by union workers here will help the country exceed the goal of creating 100,000 ventilators in 100 days.
But when it comes to testing supplies, the need is still high.
But when it comes to testing supplies, the need is still high.
Governor Evers wants to test 85,000 a week, and Milwaukee Mayor Barrett needs more testing to address the disproportionate number African Americans hit hardest by COVID-19 cases and deaths.
Governor Evers wants to test 85,000 a week, and Milwaukee Mayor Barrett needs more testing to address the disproportionate number African Americans hit hardest by COVID-19 cases and deaths.
8:10 p.m. -- You could be fined up to $500 if you violate the Safer at Home order in Milwaukee
8:10 p.m. -- You could be fined up to $500 if you violate the Safer at Home order in Milwaukee
Milwaukee police can now issue citations with fines up to $500 to people who don't comply with Gov. Tony Evers' "Safer at Home" order.
Milwaukee police can now issue citations with fines up to $500 to people who don't comply with Gov. Tony Evers' "Safer at Home" order.
The Milwaukee Common Council unanimously approved an ordinance Tuesday "relating to enforcement of communicable disease orders." It authorizes the commissioner of health and police officers to issue orders and citations to anyone who willfully violates or obstructs the execution of an order issued under state statute.
The Milwaukee Common Council unanimously approved an ordinance Tuesday "relating to enforcement of communicable disease orders." It authorizes the commissioner of health and police officers to issue orders and citations to anyone who willfully violates or obstructs the execution of an order issued under state statute.
Statute 252 says the department "may close schools and forbid public gatherings in schools, churches, and other places to control outbreaks and epidemics." It also says the department can authorize and implement "all emergency measures necessary" to control communicable diseases.
Statute 252 says the department "may close schools and forbid public gatherings in schools, churches, and other places to control outbreaks and epidemics." It also says the department can authorize and implement "all emergency measures necessary" to control communicable diseases.
Milwaukee Police Chief Alfonso Morales says there have been 107 arrests related to Statute 252.
Milwaukee Police Chief Alfonso Morales says there have been 107 arrests related to Statute 252.
"There are times that we have to enforce it, and we are enforcing those that are committing crimes or being involved in crime to put themselves in position to be a part of a criminal act," said Chief Morales in a Milwaukee County briefing Tuesday afternoon. "We try to educate, but when push comes to shove, we have to do our job. [If] things get out of control. We have to do our job and do the enforcement piece."
"There are times that we have to enforce it, and we are enforcing those that are committing crimes or being involved in crime to put themselves in position to be a part of a criminal act," said Chief Morales in a Milwaukee County briefing Tuesday afternoon. "We try to educate, but when push comes to shove, we have to do our job. [If] things get out of control. We have to do our job and do the enforcement piece."
7:49 p.m. -- Stimulus aid comes to some small businesses, others anxiously waiting
7:49 p.m. -- Stimulus aid comes to some small businesses, others anxiously waiting
Small businesses are caught in the middle as the federal government nears the next coronavirus stimulus package.
Small businesses are caught in the middle as the federal government nears the next coronavirus stimulus package.
"I'm really lucky and really thankful," said AJ Dixon, Chef and Owner of Lazy Susan MKE in Bay View.
"I'm really lucky and really thankful," said AJ Dixon, Chef and Owner of Lazy Susan MKE in Bay View.
Dixon caught some of the billions of dollars available from the federal relief programs meant for small businesses before they dried up.
Dixon caught some of the billions of dollars available from the federal relief programs meant for small businesses before they dried up.
It does not guarantee the restaurant will survive this pandemic, but Dixon says it helps.
It does not guarantee the restaurant will survive this pandemic, but Dixon says it helps.
"It's extremely helpful. It's just a relief to know that I can provide for my staff with full-time pay and full-time hours," said Dixon.
"It's extremely helpful. It's just a relief to know that I can provide for my staff with full-time pay and full-time hours," said Dixon.
Matt Willers, who owns South Milwaukee's Barbiere's Italian Inn, had a different experience.
Matt Willers, who owns South Milwaukee's Barbiere's Italian Inn, had a different experience.
Willers also applied for federal relief but did not get any funding.
Willers also applied for federal relief but did not get any funding.
"It eats on my soul because I put so many years into the business, and it definitely gets emotional," said Willers.
"It eats on my soul because I put so many years into the business, and it definitely gets emotional," said Willers.
Willers is upset over the process, especially after learning banks are the ones doling out the money, and big chain restaurants got funding meant to help small businesses. Stories like this are familiar.
Willers is upset over the process, especially after learning banks are the ones doling out the money, and big chain restaurants got funding meant to help small businesses. Stories like this are familiar.
"There's just so much need and so much money out there that if you're not in line and you're not ready to go, it's not gonna happen," said Mark Kass, Editor at the Milwaukee Business Journal.
"There's just so much need and so much money out there that if you're not in line and you're not ready to go, it's not gonna happen," said Mark Kass, Editor at the Milwaukee Business Journal.
MBJ reports lenders approved more than $8 billion in loans for Wisconsin businesses.
MBJ reports lenders approved more than $8 billion in loans for Wisconsin businesses.
However, Kass says there is a lot of anxiousness in the business community. A lot of people thought they had relief funds coming only to learn the programs were exhausted so quickly. Countless businesses are still in need and anxious after waiting to see what the next relief program looks like.
However, Kass says there is a lot of anxiousness in the business community. A lot of people thought they had relief funds coming only to learn the programs were exhausted so quickly. Countless businesses are still in need and anxious after waiting to see what the next relief program looks like.
6:40 p.m. -- Who does COVID-19 testing? Milwaukee's Public Health Lab Director spells out the process
6:40 p.m. -- Who does COVID-19 testing? Milwaukee's Public Health Lab Director spells out the process
If you've been confused about the COVID-19 testing process here in our state, you're not alone.
If you've been confused about the COVID-19 testing process here in our state, you're not alone.
TMJ4 News' Lauren Linder talked with the Milwaukee Public Health Lab Director to clear the air.
TMJ4 News' Lauren Linder talked with the Milwaukee Public Health Lab Director to clear the air.
Across the country, officials and experts continue to throw around the word "testing" to talk about tracking positive and negative cases of COVID-19. However, when the term is used, there can be some miscommunication.
Across the country, officials and experts continue to throw around the word "testing" to talk about tracking positive and negative cases of COVID-19. However, when the term is used, there can be some miscommunication.
The Milwaukee Public Health Lab in the Frank P. Zeidler Municipal Building is one of the places where actual testing is being done.
The Milwaukee Public Health Lab in the Frank P. Zeidler Municipal Building is one of the places where actual testing is being done.
Dr. Sanjib Bhattacharyya is the lab director.
Dr. Sanjib Bhattacharyya is the lab director.
"That's some misnomer how it's being used," Dr. Bhattacharyya said.
"That's some misnomer how it's being used," Dr. Bhattacharyya said.
Think about testing in two parts: (1) collecting a sample or swab and (2) the processing of that collection.
Think about testing in two parts: (1) collecting a sample or swab and (2) the processing of that collection.
Dr. Bhattacharyya said labs only do the latter.
Dr. Bhattacharyya said labs only do the latter.
Wisconsin's two public health labs in Madison and Milwaukee are primarily processing those with critical symptoms.
Wisconsin's two public health labs in Madison and Milwaukee are primarily processing those with critical symptoms.
"Local hospitals, Ascension, Columbia St. Mary's, Froedtert, Children's, everybody pretty much sends their high-risk patients to us," Dr. Bhattacharyya said.
"Local hospitals, Ascension, Columbia St. Mary's, Froedtert, Children's, everybody pretty much sends their high-risk patients to us," Dr. Bhattacharyya said.
When it comes to those with mild symptoms, healthcare providers and clinics are usually sending samples to private labs.
When it comes to those with mild symptoms, healthcare providers and clinics are usually sending samples to private labs.
"They'll go to the large volume local laboratories and clinical laboratories, or they may have contracted with the national reference laboratories," Dr. Bhattacharyya said.
"They'll go to the large volume local laboratories and clinical laboratories, or they may have contracted with the national reference laboratories," Dr. Bhattacharyya said.
6:12 p.m. -- Every Milwaukee voter will get absentee ballot application mailed
6:12 p.m. -- Every Milwaukee voter will get absentee ballot application mailed
Milwaukee's Common Council voted unanimously to approve a program that would mail absentee ballot applications to every registered voter.
Milwaukee's Common Council voted unanimously to approve a program that would mail absentee ballot applications to every registered voter.
The city's April 7th election will forever be linked to images of voters in face masks, some waiting in line for hours.
The city's April 7th election will forever be linked to images of voters in face masks, some waiting in line for hours.
Some voters felt they were chancing their health to vote. Others stayed home or missed out completely when they say their absentee ballots failed to show up on time.
Some voters felt they were chancing their health to vote. Others stayed home or missed out completely when they say their absentee ballots failed to show up on time.
"We all just experienced an election that was scary for many and that many were unable to participate the way that they wanted to. So we learned from that experience," said District 14 Alderwoman Marina Dimitrijevic.
"We all just experienced an election that was scary for many and that many were unable to participate the way that they wanted to. So we learned from that experience," said District 14 Alderwoman Marina Dimitrijevic.
Alderwoman Dimitrijevic authored the resolution to create the "SafeVote Program."
Alderwoman Dimitrijevic authored the resolution to create the "SafeVote Program."
The program would send applications and a postage-paid return envelope to 300,000 voters. Neil Albrecht, Executive Director at the Milwaukee Election Commission, estimates 10-12 percent of registered voters already plan to vote absentee.
The program would send applications and a postage-paid return envelope to 300,000 voters. Neil Albrecht, Executive Director at the Milwaukee Election Commission, estimates 10-12 percent of registered voters already plan to vote absentee.
Albrecht estimates the cost will be $180,000 and hopes the election commission will be able to absorb it into this year's budget.
Albrecht estimates the cost will be $180,000 and hopes the election commission will be able to absorb it into this year's budget.
Local leaders say the mailings give voters every opportunity to cast a ballot safely despite restrictions caused by or intensified by the pandemic, which may still be going on by the next election.
Local leaders say the mailings give voters every opportunity to cast a ballot safely despite restrictions caused by or intensified by the pandemic, which may still be going on by the next election.
When asked about concerns regarding absentee ballots during the April election, Albrecht pointed to the chaotic circumstances surround that specific election. He thinks preparation will allow a better response to potential issues moving forward.
When asked about concerns regarding absentee ballots during the April election, Albrecht pointed to the chaotic circumstances surround that specific election. He thinks preparation will allow a better response to potential issues moving forward.
"I think it's very good that that resolution passed today because it really encourages a very thoughtful planning process and the opportunity to build infrastructure and capacity," said Albrecht.
"I think it's very good that that resolution passed today because it really encourages a very thoughtful planning process and the opportunity to build infrastructure and capacity," said Albrecht.
The city's election commission is charged with formulating the plan and sorting out logistics within 30 days. The Common Council will have to approve it.
The city's election commission is charged with formulating the plan and sorting out logistics within 30 days. The Common Council will have to approve it.
"It's better to be prepared. I don't think anyone is ever going to look back and say all we were over-prepared, so let's make it as easy as possible," said Dimitrijevic.
"It's better to be prepared. I don't think anyone is ever going to look back and say all we were over-prepared, so let's make it as easy as possible," said Dimitrijevic.
6:08 p.m. -- Oconomowoc woman on pace to sew 1,300th mask this week
6:08 p.m. -- Oconomowoc woman on pace to sew 1,300th mask this week
You may know someone or have heard of someone sewing masks for frontlines workers, immunocompromised individuals, or other emergency personnel; however, you probably haven't heard about someone doing it at the scale of one woman in Oconomowoc.
You may know someone or have heard of someone sewing masks for frontlines workers, immunocompromised individuals, or other emergency personnel; however, you probably haven't heard about someone doing it at the scale of one woman in Oconomowoc.
Introducing Tricia Griswold. She will sew her 1,300th mask by the end of the week.
Introducing Tricia Griswold. She will sew her 1,300th mask by the end of the week.
"I get up, and I start sewing them at seven, and sometimes I go till 1:00, 2:00 in the morning," the Oconomowoc sewer said.
"I get up, and I start sewing them at seven, and sometimes I go till 1:00, 2:00 in the morning," the Oconomowoc sewer said.
The most she has sewn in one day was 67, but Griswold tends to average 50 a day she said.
The most she has sewn in one day was 67, but Griswold tends to average 50 a day she said.
It all started six weeks ago. Since then, she has included her daughters as well some friends in making the masks.
It all started six weeks ago. Since then, she has included her daughters as well some friends in making the masks.
"It makes me feel kind of useful knowing I can help," Griswold said.
"It makes me feel kind of useful knowing I can help," Griswold said.
All of the masks are compliant with CDC guidelines. She also said nurses would send her steps on how to make the kinds they need.
All of the masks are compliant with CDC guidelines. She also said nurses would send her steps on how to make the kinds they need.
At first, she was making these specifically for frontline workers like nurses. That transitioned to police departments and other first responders, and eventually, word got out, and she began sending them all over the country.
At first, she was making these specifically for frontline workers like nurses. That transitioned to police departments and other first responders, and eventually, word got out, and she began sending them all over the country.
Her masks have gone to people in Michigan, Minnesota, Indiana, and Florida. Griswold said that they have even gone to the USNS Mercy, a military hospital boat docked in Los Angeles.
Her masks have gone to people in Michigan, Minnesota, Indiana, and Florida. Griswold said that they have even gone to the USNS Mercy, a military hospital boat docked in Los Angeles.
"I got a lot of texts, a lot of messages from people who don't have anything. When they go to work and it kind of just makes me - it pushes me harder to just to make sure they have something," she said.
"I got a lot of texts, a lot of messages from people who don't have anything. When they go to work and it kind of just makes me - it pushes me harder to just to make sure they have something," she said.
She said there are no plans on stopping as long as there is a need.
She said there are no plans on stopping as long as there is a need.
5:52 p.m. -- Areas see significant increase in garbage production after Safer at Home order
5:52 p.m. -- Areas see significant increase in garbage production after Safer at Home order
Several Public Works Departments are seeing a significant increase in garbage production since Gov. Tony Evers' Safer at Home Order went into effect in March.
Several Public Works Departments are seeing a significant increase in garbage production since Gov. Tony Evers' Safer at Home Order went into effect in March.
The City of Kenosha says they've seen a 20 percent increase in garbage production since March.
The City of Kenosha says they've seen a 20 percent increase in garbage production since March.
"We've added 350 tons of garbage to ten guys over 13 days," Keir Powell, Superintendent of the Kenosha Waste and Recycling Division, said.
"We've added 350 tons of garbage to ten guys over 13 days," Keir Powell, Superintendent of the Kenosha Waste and Recycling Division, said.
Powell says the 350 tons can be attributed to several factors related to the Stay at Home Order. Schools, businesses, restaurants, and bars often have a private company collect the trash made there. With all of those places closed, people working from home and ordering take out, families are creating more of that trash at home.
Powell says the 350 tons can be attributed to several factors related to the Stay at Home Order. Schools, businesses, restaurants, and bars often have a private company collect the trash made there. With all of those places closed, people working from home and ordering take out, families are creating more of that trash at home.
Plus, people are using their extra time to be productive and start their spring cleaning.
Plus, people are using their extra time to be productive and start their spring cleaning.
"It's an opportunity to clean out the basement," Powell said. "We deal with spring cleaning. I've seen many garages where you can't get a car in there. Maybe now, they want to get the car in the garage. When you're home and have that added time, there are all kinds of different things you can do, like yard work. We're seeing more yard waste on the curb also."
"It's an opportunity to clean out the basement," Powell said. "We deal with spring cleaning. I've seen many garages where you can't get a car in there. Maybe now, they want to get the car in the garage. When you're home and have that added time, there are all kinds of different things you can do, like yard work. We're seeing more yard waste on the curb also."
4:07 p.m. -- Milwaukee Brewers, Miller Lite to host virtual happy hour Thursday
4:07 p.m. -- Milwaukee Brewers, Miller Lite to host virtual happy hour Thursday
Ditch your previously scheduled Thirsty Thursday plans, because the Brewers are inviting you to their Virtual Happy Hour.
Ditch your previously scheduled Thirsty Thursday plans, because the Brewers are inviting you to their Virtual Happy Hour.
The Brew Crew is hosting a virtual happy hour this Thursday sponsored by Miller Lite via Zoom video call.
The Brew Crew is hosting a virtual happy hour this Thursday sponsored by Miller Lite via Zoom video call.
The first 1,000 fans on the call at 5 p.m. will have the chance to chat with broadcaster Brian Anderson, Hall of Famer Robin Yount, President of Baseball Operations and General Manager David Stearns and All Star pitcher Brandon Woodruff.
The first 1,000 fans on the call at 5 p.m. will have the chance to chat with broadcaster Brian Anderson, Hall of Famer Robin Yount, President of Baseball Operations and General Manager David Stearns and All Star pitcher Brandon Woodruff.
Secure your spot to the happy hour by monitoring the Milwaukee Brewers Twitter and Facebook pages and Instagram story at 5 p.m. Thursday. Spots are first come first serve.
Secure your spot to the happy hour by monitoring the Milwaukee Brewers Twitter and Facebook pages and Instagram story at 5 p.m. Thursday. Spots are first come first serve.
Once you get your spot, the Brewers encourage you to crack a cold Miller Lite or Leinenkugel Summer Shandy to talk all things baseball. Fans will have the opportunity to submit topics or questions to be discussed during the call.
Once you get your spot, the Brewers encourage you to crack a cold Miller Lite or Leinenkugel Summer Shandy to talk all things baseball. Fans will have the opportunity to submit topics or questions to be discussed during the call.
“Sports and beer have always brought people together, and while we can’t wait to be back in Miller Park, we hope this provides a fun and entertaining distraction from the challenging circumstances we’re all facing right now," said Great Lakes Regional Vice President for Molson Coors Beverage Company Andrew McGuire.
“Sports and beer have always brought people together, and while we can’t wait to be back in Miller Park, we hope this provides a fun and entertaining distraction from the challenging circumstances we’re all facing right now," said Great Lakes Regional Vice President for Molson Coors Beverage Company Andrew McGuire.
3:19 p.m. -- DWD now accepting assistance applications for individuals not previous covered by unemployment
3:19 p.m. -- DWD now accepting assistance applications for individuals not previous covered by unemployment
The Wisconsin Department of Workforce Development announced that it was now accepting applications for their Pandemic Unemployment Assistance program.
The Wisconsin Department of Workforce Development announced that it was now accepting applications for their Pandemic Unemployment Assistance program.
The program offers assistance to those who became unemployed because of the coronavirus pandmeic and were not previously covered under regular unemployment.
The program offers assistance to those who became unemployed because of the coronavirus pandmeic and were not previously covered under regular unemployment.
This includes people who were self-employed, people with limited, recent work history, and those who have exhaused any other forms of state and federal unemployment benefits.
This includes people who were self-employed, people with limited, recent work history, and those who have exhaused any other forms of state and federal unemployment benefits.
The DWD said that the maximum PUA benefit is $370 and is available for 39 weeks. Those who will receive funds from PUA can also receive a $600 weekly benefit from the federal unemployment compensation (FPUC)
The DWD said that the maximum PUA benefit is $370 and is available for 39 weeks. Those who will receive funds from PUA can also receive a $600 weekly benefit from the federal unemployment compensation (FPUC)
To qualify, the person applying must meet eligibility requirements listed below from the DWD:
To qualify, the person applying must meet eligibility requirements listed below from the DWD:

  1. The individual has been diagnosed with COVID-19 or is experiencing symptoms of COVID-19 and is seeking a medical diagnosis.
  2. A member of the individual’s household has been diagnosed with COVID-19.
  3. The individual is providing care for a family member or a household member who has been diagnosed with COVID-19.
  4. A child or other person in the household for which the individual has primary caregiving responsibility is unable to attend school or another facility that is closed as a direct result of the COVID-19 public health emergency and such school or facility care is required for the individual to work.
  5. The individual is unable to reach the place of employment because of a quarantine imposed as a direct result of the COVID-19 public health emergency.
  6. The individual is unable to reach the place of employment because the individual has been advised by a health care provider to self-quarantine due to concerns related to COVID-19.
  7. The individual was scheduled to commence employment and does not have a job or is unable to reach the job as a direct result of the COVID-19 public health emergency.
  8. The individual has become the breadwinner or major support for a household because the head of the household has died as a direct result of COVID-19.
  9. The individual had to quit their job as a direct result of COVID-19.
  10. The individual’s place of employment is closed as a direct result of the COVID-19 public health emergency.

To learn more or apply, click here.
To learn more or apply, click here.
2:46 p.m. -- WIAA officially cancels Wisconsin high school spring sports
2:46 p.m. -- WIAA officially cancels Wisconsin high school spring sports
The Wisconsin Interscholastic Athletic Association has officially canceled all spring high school sports in the state as the coronavirus pandemic rages on.
The Wisconsin Interscholastic Athletic Association has officially canceled all spring high school sports in the state as the coronavirus pandemic rages on.
The WIAA made the decision Tuesday. Canceled sports include baseball, softball, boys golf, girls soccer, boys tennis and track.
The WIAA made the decision Tuesday. Canceled sports include baseball, softball, boys golf, girls soccer, boys tennis and track.
The move was expected after Gov. Tony Evers extended his stay-at-home and school closure order through May 26. The order continues a prohibition on all interscholastic training, practices, scrimmages and contests.
The move was expected after Gov. Tony Evers extended his stay-at-home and school closure order through May 26. The order continues a prohibition on all interscholastic training, practices, scrimmages and contests.

2:28 p.m. -- Wisconsin Legislature files legal action against Gov. Tony Evers' extended Safer at Home order
2:28 p.m. -- Wisconsin Legislature files legal action against Gov. Tony Evers' extended Safer at Home order
The Wisconsin Legislature has filed legal action against Gov. Tony Evers over his extension of the Safer at Home order.
The Wisconsin Legislature has filed legal action against Gov. Tony Evers over his extension of the Safer at Home order.
The original order was scheduled to expire on April 24, but Evers extended it to May 26.
The original order was scheduled to expire on April 24, but Evers extended it to May 26.
The legislature filed legal action in the Wisconsin State Supreme Court challenging Evers' order.
The legislature filed legal action in the Wisconsin State Supreme Court challenging Evers' order.
“The public outcry over the Safer at Home order continues to increase as positive COVID cases decrease or remain flat. There’s immense frustration regarding the extension, as it goes beyond the executive branch’s statutory powers," said Speaker Robin Vos and Senate Majority Leader Scott Fitzgerald. "Wisconsinites are forced to sit by with no voice in the process. Other Midwestern states with more confirmed cases, like Ohio, have set firm dates to begin a phased reopening far earlier than the Evers administration."
“The public outcry over the Safer at Home order continues to increase as positive COVID cases decrease or remain flat. There’s immense frustration regarding the extension, as it goes beyond the executive branch’s statutory powers," said Speaker Robin Vos and Senate Majority Leader Scott Fitzgerald. "Wisconsinites are forced to sit by with no voice in the process. Other Midwestern states with more confirmed cases, like Ohio, have set firm dates to begin a phased reopening far earlier than the Evers administration."
On Monday, Evers announced the "Badger Bounce Back Program," which detailed a phased plan to reopening Wisconsin.
On Monday, Evers announced the "Badger Bounce Back Program," which detailed a phased plan to reopening Wisconsin.
The plan has three phases and specific requirements needed in order to allow the state to reopen its economy.
The plan has three phases and specific requirements needed in order to allow the state to reopen its economy.
"Right now, Wisconsin does not meet the criteria the White House established to start reopening our state," Gov. Evers said Monday. "But with our Badger Bounce Back plan, we're going to be taking some important steps to get us there."
"Right now, Wisconsin does not meet the criteria the White House established to start reopening our state," Gov. Evers said Monday. "But with our Badger Bounce Back plan, we're going to be taking some important steps to get us there."
"The governor has denied the people a voice through this unprecedented administrative overreach. Unfortunately, that leaves the legislature no choice but to ask the Supreme Court to rein in this obvious abuse of power. Wisconsinites deserve certainty, transparency, and a plan to end the constant stream of executive orders that are eroding both the economy and their liberty even as the state is clearly seeing a decline in COVID infections," said Vos and Fitzgerald.
"The governor has denied the people a voice through this unprecedented administrative overreach. Unfortunately, that leaves the legislature no choice but to ask the Supreme Court to rein in this obvious abuse of power. Wisconsinites deserve certainty, transparency, and a plan to end the constant stream of executive orders that are eroding both the economy and their liberty even as the state is clearly seeing a decline in COVID infections," said Vos and Fitzgerald.
To read the full legal action, click here.
To read the full legal action, click here.

1:51 p.m. -- Milwaukee Common Council votes unanimously to send every registered voter absentee ballot application
1:51 p.m. -- Milwaukee Common Council votes unanimously to send every registered voter absentee ballot application
The Milwaukee Common Council voted unanimously Tuesday to approve a new plan that would mail every registered voter in the city an application for an absentee ballot.
The Milwaukee Common Council voted unanimously Tuesday to approve a new plan that would mail every registered voter in the city an application for an absentee ballot.
The plan would authorize the executive director of the Milwaukee Election Commission to create what is called the "SafeVote program." Along with mailing absentee ballot applications en masse, everyone in the City of Milwaukee would also receive a postage-paid envelope to return the application.
The plan would authorize the executive director of the Milwaukee Election Commission to create what is called the "SafeVote program." Along with mailing absentee ballot applications en masse, everyone in the City of Milwaukee would also receive a postage-paid envelope to return the application.
“The right to vote is sacred in our democracy, and I am grateful for the support of my colleagues on SafeVote," Alderwoman Marina Dimitrijevic, who authored the resolution, said. “The unprecedented COVID-19 pandemic has made congregating in groups a threat to public health, and we recognize that voting by mail must be seen as the best way to ensure the best possible participation in a vital election."
“The right to vote is sacred in our democracy, and I am grateful for the support of my colleagues on SafeVote," Alderwoman Marina Dimitrijevic, who authored the resolution, said. “The unprecedented COVID-19 pandemic has made congregating in groups a threat to public health, and we recognize that voting by mail must be seen as the best way to ensure the best possible participation in a vital election."
Alderman Khalif J. Rainey, the measure's primary co-sponsor, said the resolution will help prevent a repeat of this spring's election, in which nearly 20,000 Milwaukeeans braved the coronavirus pandemic to vote in person.
Alderman Khalif J. Rainey, the measure's primary co-sponsor, said the resolution will help prevent a repeat of this spring's election, in which nearly 20,000 Milwaukeeans braved the coronavirus pandemic to vote in person.
“The spectacle of thousands of citizens gathering to vote on April 7, while in a way inspiring, was an unacceptable danger to their own well-being and that of others,” Alderman Rainey said. “Affording residents the opportunity to vote by mail in an efficient and safe manner is the right way to go this fall."
“The spectacle of thousands of citizens gathering to vote on April 7, while in a way inspiring, was an unacceptable danger to their own well-being and that of others,” Alderman Rainey said. “Affording residents the opportunity to vote by mail in an efficient and safe manner is the right way to go this fall."
The resolution will need to be approved by Mayor Tom Barrett before it is put into practice.
The resolution will need to be approved by Mayor Tom Barrett before it is put into practice.

1:05 p.m. -- Local doctor shares key to avoiding burnout while working at home
1:05 p.m. -- Local doctor shares key to avoiding burnout while working at home
Working from home is becoming the norm for many people as the coronavirus (COVID-19) forces businesses to limit how many people can gather inside of buildings. The mental health challenges that come along with working from home are another thing people are struggling with in recent times.
Working from home is becoming the norm for many people as the coronavirus (COVID-19) forces businesses to limit how many people can gather inside of buildings. The mental health challenges that come along with working from home are another thing people are struggling with in recent times.
Dr. Jon Lehrmann, a psychiatrist at Wisconsin School of Medicine, says there are some things people can do to try and limit the risk of burnout and to take care of their mental health while we wait for COVID-19 to go away.
Dr. Jon Lehrmann, a psychiatrist at Wisconsin School of Medicine, says there are some things people can do to try and limit the risk of burnout and to take care of their mental health while we wait for COVID-19 to go away.
For Tirney Konitzer, the pressure is mounting.
For Tirney Konitzer, the pressure is mounting.

Local doctor shares key to avoiding burnout while working at home

"I'm crying and I'm like, 'I don't know what to make for dinner, I don't know how to do this," said Konitzer who is learning how to balance working from home and parenting in the same place, at the same time.
"I'm crying and I'm like, 'I don't know what to make for dinner, I don't know how to do this," said Konitzer who is learning how to balance working from home and parenting in the same place, at the same time.
The constant interruptions by her 2-year-old make her sales job in the corporate world very difficult.
The constant interruptions by her 2-year-old make her sales job in the corporate world very difficult.
"I feel like I'm failing both as an employee and as as a mom if I'm being completely honest," she said.
"I feel like I'm failing both as an employee and as as a mom if I'm being completely honest," she said.
Adding to that pressure, her partner is a nurse who is working inside a local ICU. To limit the risk of spreading COVID-19 to the family, he is not currently coming home. His absence has become another challenge that is mentally taxing on both Tirney and her daughter.
Adding to that pressure, her partner is a nurse who is working inside a local ICU. To limit the risk of spreading COVID-19 to the family, he is not currently coming home. His absence has become another challenge that is mentally taxing on both Tirney and her daughter.
"On an emotional level, she's having a hard time and I don't know how to help her through that right now either because I don't even know how to handle these emotions," said Konitzer.
"On an emotional level, she's having a hard time and I don't know how to help her through that right now either because I don't even know how to handle these emotions," said Konitzer.
Read the full story here.
Read the full story here.

11:57 a.m. -- Milwaukee Bucks' Khris Middleton donates $25K to MPS COVID-19 Relief Fund
11:57 a.m. -- Milwaukee Bucks' Khris Middleton donates $25K to MPS COVID-19 Relief Fund
Milwaukee Bucks All-Star Khris Middleton and the Joseph and Vera Zilber Family Trust Fund have teamed up in donating a total of $50,000 to the Milwaukee Public School Foundation's COVID-19 Relief Fund.
Milwaukee Bucks All-Star Khris Middleton and the Joseph and Vera Zilber Family Trust Fund have teamed up in donating a total of $50,000 to the Milwaukee Public School Foundation's COVID-19 Relief Fund.
Middleton's $25,000 donation was matched by the Jospeh and Vera Zilber Family Trust Fund through the Greater Milwaukee Foundation. Together, the two gifts will provide nearly 2,500 supply kits for students and families.
Kits will be filled with cleaning and hygiene products such as hand soap and laundry detergent, as well as academic books and games, arts and crafts, playing cards, board games and puzzles.
Kits will be filled with cleaning and hygiene products such as hand soap and laundry detergent, as well as academic books and games, arts and crafts, playing cards, board games and puzzles.
The MPS Foundation has raised a total of $60,000 for students and their families during these uncertain times through two newly established funds.
The MPS Foundation has raised a total of $60,000 for students and their families during these uncertain times through two newly established funds.
The COVID-19 Relief Fund supplies e-learning tools for students and staff, as well as household supplies and activity packages.
The COVID-19 Relief Fund supplies e-learning tools for students and staff, as well as household supplies and activity packages.
Nutrition Support has been put into place to help MPS continue to provide healthy meals, snacks and food packages for students, families and community members in need.
Nutrition Support has been put into place to help MPS continue to provide healthy meals, snacks and food packages for students, families and community members in need.
“We are truly grateful for our community coming together in support of Milwaukee Public Schools students and families in this time of need. We appreciate the generosity of the Milwaukee Public Schools Foundation donors and hope others will join this effort in advancing student achievement,” said Dr. Keith P. Posley, Superintendent of Milwaukee Public Schools.
“We are truly grateful for our community coming together in support of Milwaukee Public Schools students and families in this time of need. We appreciate the generosity of the Milwaukee Public Schools Foundation donors and hope others will join this effort in advancing student achievement,” said Dr. Keith P. Posley, Superintendent of Milwaukee Public Schools.
The MPS Foundation has provided over $2.6 million in grant commitments to MPS students and district programs since 2015.
The MPS Foundation has provided over $2.6 million in grant commitments to MPS students and district programs since 2015.
If you're interested in donating to one of the above MPS programs, visit their website.
If you're interested in donating to one of the above MPS programs, visit their website.
If you're interested in donating to one of the above MPS programs, visit their website.
11:11 a.m. -- Wisconsin Democrats call on Trump for more supplies
11:11 a.m. -- Wisconsin Democrats call on Trump for more supplies
Three Democratic members of Wisconsin’s congressional delegation are telling President Donald Trump that the federal government needs to do more to ensure that Wisconsin has the needed supplies to increase testing for coronavirus.
Three Democratic members of Wisconsin’s congressional delegation are telling President Donald Trump that the federal government needs to do more to ensure that Wisconsin has the needed supplies to increase testing for coronavirus.
The letter comes ahead of Vice President Mike Pence’s visit to a ventilator manufacturer in Madison on Tuesday.
The letter comes ahead of Vice President Mike Pence’s visit to a ventilator manufacturer in Madison on Tuesday.
The concerns from U.S. Sen. Tammy Baldwin and Reps. Gwen Moore and Mark Pocan echo those made by governors, including Wisconsin's Tony Evers.
The concerns from U.S. Sen. Tammy Baldwin and Reps. Gwen Moore and Mark Pocan echo those made by governors, including Wisconsin's Tony Evers.
Pence was scheduled to visit a GE Healthcare manufacturing facility to highlight the production of ventilators.
Pence was scheduled to visit a GE Healthcare manufacturing facility to highlight the production of ventilators.
Pence was scheduled to visit a GE Healthcare manufacturing facility to highlight the production of ventilators.
10:44 a.m. -- Kemps to donate 'shelf-stable' milk to Wisconsin food banks
10:44 a.m. -- Kemps to donate 'shelf-stable' milk to Wisconsin food banks
While food banks are reporting increased demand across the country amid the coronavirus pandemic, a locally-based company is donating "shelf-stable" milk to area food banks.
While food banks are reporting increased demand across the country amid the coronavirus pandemic, a locally-based company is donating "shelf-stable" milk to area food banks.
Kemps is donating 250,000 Giving Cows to area food banks. The milk is specially-designed, shelf-stable milk that have a shelf-life of up to 12 months. The milk comes in single-serve, 8-ounce boxes. According to Kemps, fresh milk has a shelf life of approximately 20 days from processing. Giving Cows are specifically designed for food pantries.
Kemps is donating 250,000 Giving Cows to area food banks. The milk is specially-designed, shelf-stable milk that have a shelf-life of up to 12 months. The milk comes in single-serve, 8-ounce boxes. According to Kemps, fresh milk has a shelf life of approximately 20 days from processing. Giving Cows are specifically designed for food pantries.
“Knowing that so many children are missing out on milk due to school closures, we knew that we had to help provide a solution,” said Rachel Kyllo, a spokesperson for Kemps. “Our shelf-stable Giving Cow packs are a great way to help kids get nutrient-rich milk, which is a childhood essential.”
“Knowing that so many children are missing out on milk due to school closures, we knew that we had to help provide a solution,” said Rachel Kyllo, a spokesperson for Kemps. “Our shelf-stable Giving Cow packs are a great way to help kids get nutrient-rich milk, which is a childhood essential.”
Kemps is donating 250,000 Giving Cows through the Feeding America Eastern Wisconsin - Milwaukee office on April 22.
Kemps is donating 250,000 Giving Cows through the Feeding America Eastern Wisconsin - Milwaukee office on April 22.
For information about Giving Cow and Kemps, click here.
For information about Giving Cow and Kemps, click here.
For information about Giving Cow and Kemps, click here.
10:02 a.m. -- UW-Milwaukee to implement furlough plan for all employees July 1
10:02 a.m. -- UW-Milwaukee to implement furlough plan for all employees July 1
The University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee will begin implementing furlough plans for all employees in the coming months due to the coronavirus pandemic.
The University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee will begin implementing furlough plans for all employees in the coming months due to the coronavirus pandemic.
Chancellor Mark Mone released an update on the UWM website in which he outlined the interim furlough policy.
Chancellor Mark Mone released an update on the UWM website in which he outlined the interim furlough policy.
He says furloughs will be implemented for all employees beginning July 1 and will remain in place through June 30, 2021 with certain conditions depending on the type of employee.
He says furloughs will be implemented for all employees beginning July 1 and will remain in place through June 30, 2021 with certain conditions depending on the type of employee.
According to the plan, 12-month employees will receive eight furlough days, nine-month employees will receive six days and an undisclosed higher number of days will be dispersed to higher paid 12-month employees.
According to the plan, 12-month employees will receive eight furlough days, nine-month employees will receive six days and an undisclosed higher number of days will be dispersed to higher paid 12-month employees.
"It is extremely unfortunate that we need to implement furloughs and I understand you have many concerns," said Mone in a statement. "We can weather this storm together by doing what we know how to do best – lifting up and supporting each other. We are Panthers and we are resilient."
"It is extremely unfortunate that we need to implement furloughs and I understand you have many concerns," said Mone in a statement. "We can weather this storm together by doing what we know how to do best – lifting up and supporting each other. We are Panthers and we are resilient."
Some employees may also be placed on position-specific furloughs as early as May 2, which is when the COVID-19 leave expires, according to Mone. These furloughs will not apply to faculty, but likely to employees whose work cannot be done remotely, or who are deemed essential to onsite operations, as well as those in units most impacted by immediate financial losses.
Some employees may also be placed on position-specific furloughs as early as May 2, which is when the COVID-19 leave expires, according to Mone. These furloughs will not apply to faculty, but likely to employees whose work cannot be done remotely, or who are deemed essential to onsite operations, as well as those in units most impacted by immediate financial losses.
Furloughs are not layoffs. They are unpaid, required leave of absences for a designated amount of time in which employees remain employees of the institution.
Furloughs are not layoffs. They are unpaid, required leave of absences for a designated amount of time in which employees remain employees of the institution.
"We are using furloughs instead of layoffs because it is our goal to bring employees back to their positions when normal campus operations resume, and our revenue sources are stabilized," said Mone.
"We are using furloughs instead of layoffs because it is our goal to bring employees back to their positions when normal campus operations resume, and our revenue sources are stabilized," said Mone.
"We are using furloughs instead of layoffs because it is our goal to bring employees back to their positions when normal campus operations resume, and our revenue sources are stabilized," said Mone.
"We are using furloughs instead of layoffs because it is our goal to bring employees back to their positions when normal campus operations resume, and our revenue sources are stabilized," said Mone.
Monday, April 20
Monday, April 20
10:09 p.m. -- Medical professionals worry about mental health during and after pandemic
10:09 p.m. -- Medical professionals worry about mental health during and after pandemic
Medical professionals are worried about a spike in mental health illnesses after the coronavirus pandemic passes.
Medical professionals are worried about a spike in mental health illnesses after the coronavirus pandemic passes.
Mental health was the topic of discussion at Monday night's Medical College of Wisconsin's Community Town Hall held online. Participants were able to ask questions of the assembled medical and mental health professionals.
Mental health was the topic of discussion at Monday night's Medical College of Wisconsin's Community Town Hall held online. Participants were able to ask questions of the assembled medical and mental health professionals.
Dr. Erica Arrington said issues like Depression, Anxiety, Substance Abuse, Domestic Violence, Child Abuse, and even PTSD are concerns once the pandemic subsides.
Dr. Erica Arrington said issues like Depression, Anxiety, Substance Abuse, Domestic Violence, Child Abuse, and even PTSD are concerns once the pandemic subsides.
"I think mental health in general needs to be prepared for all these and other diagnoses as well," said Arrington, an associate professor of Psychiatry at The Medical College of Wisconsin.
"I think mental health in general needs to be prepared for all these and other diagnoses as well," said Arrington, an associate professor of Psychiatry at The Medical College of Wisconsin.
Psychologist Dr. Kweku Ramel Smith said he worries about those in the middle of it all.
Psychologist Dr. Kweku Ramel Smith said he worries about those in the middle of it all.
"We want to make sure that we have extra support for those that have been on the front lines. Because when we talk about post-traumatic stress disorder, I think we're going to see that increase in those professionals who have served us so bravely at this point," said Smith.
"We want to make sure that we have extra support for those that have been on the front lines. Because when we talk about post-traumatic stress disorder, I think we're going to see that increase in those professionals who have served us so bravely at this point," said Smith.
The college will host another webinar next week where the public is invited to ask questions. You can find out more here.
The college will host another webinar next week where the public is invited to ask questions. You can find out more here.
The college will host another webinar next week where the public is invited to ask questions. You can find out more here.
9:44 p.m. -- Seven COVID-19 cases appear to be linked to Wisconsin election, Milwaukee health commissioner says
9:44 p.m. -- Seven COVID-19 cases appear to be linked to Wisconsin election, Milwaukee health commissioner says
Early data suggests some new COVID-19 cases are linked to those who voted in the Wisconsin election on April 7.
Early data suggests some new COVID-19 cases are linked to those who voted in the Wisconsin election on April 7.
Milwaukee Health Commissioner Jeanette Kowalik said it appears seven people contracted COVID-19 through election-related activities. That includes showing up to vote at one of the five polling places in the City of Milwaukee, or they worked at one of the polling sites.
Milwaukee Health Commissioner Jeanette Kowalik said it appears seven people contracted COVID-19 through election-related activities. That includes showing up to vote at one of the five polling places in the City of Milwaukee, or they worked at one of the polling sites.
Officials are expected to learn more information on the link between in-person voting and COVID-19 cases by the end of this week.
Officials are expected to learn more information on the link between in-person voting and COVID-19 cases by the end of this week.
Kowalik says they only have 30% of the data when it comes to new COVID-19 cases as it relates to Election Day.
Kowalik says they only have 30% of the data when it comes to new COVID-19 cases as it relates to Election Day.
Kowalik says they only have 30% of the data when it comes to new COVID-19 cases as it relates to Election Day.
9:25 p.m. -- Milwaukee man survives coronavirus after being on a ventilator for 13 days
9:25 p.m. -- Milwaukee man survives coronavirus after being on a ventilator for 13 days
A Milwaukee man has survived the coronavirus after being on a ventilator for 13 days.
A Milwaukee man has survived the coronavirus after being on a ventilator for 13 days.
Paul Williams, 40, was discharged from Ascension St. Joseph's Hospital on Monday afternoon. Doctors, nurses and other health workers lined the lobby, cheering him on while his brother picked him up to take him home.
Paul Williams, 40, was discharged from Ascension St. Joseph's Hospital on Monday afternoon. Doctors, nurses and other health workers lined the lobby, cheering him on while his brother picked him up to take him home.
"I just thank God, I just know there’s a God, I seen both sides, and I’m not playing," Williams said.
"I just thank God, I just know there’s a God, I seen both sides, and I’m not playing," Williams said.
Williams fell ill weeks before he went to the hospital.
Williams fell ill weeks before he went to the hospital.
"I was laying in bed for two weeks, and I told my sister, I stood up and almost fell," Williams said. "And I was like call an ambulance right now."
"I was laying in bed for two weeks, and I told my sister, I stood up and almost fell," Williams said. "And I was like call an ambulance right now."
He went to the emergency room on April 2. His doctor said Williams was talking, but within 24 hours he had to be put on a ventilator and fell into a coma, where he would remain for 13 days.
He went to the emergency room on April 2. His doctor said Williams was talking, but within 24 hours he had to be put on a ventilator and fell into a coma, where he would remain for 13 days.
"On the seventh day we thought we almost lost him because we took out his tube," said Dr. Om Ahuja. "He was running low oxygen for almost 12 hours."
"On the seventh day we thought we almost lost him because we took out his tube," said Dr. Om Ahuja. "He was running low oxygen for almost 12 hours."
But Williams pulled through. On Monday, after a total of 18 days in the hospital, doctors celebrated his life. Williams doesn't need oxygen, but doctors say it will be a few weeks before he is completely back to normal.
But Williams pulled through. On Monday, after a total of 18 days in the hospital, doctors celebrated his life. Williams doesn't need oxygen, but doctors say it will be a few weeks before he is completely back to normal.
"The way he was sick, it’s amazing that he made it," Ahuja said.
"The way he was sick, it’s amazing that he made it," Ahuja said.
As of Monday, the virus has killed 127 people in Milwaukee County, and more than half of those deaths are African-American. Williams lives just a few blocks from St. Joseph's on Milwaukee's north side, an area that's been hit particularly hard.
As of Monday, the virus has killed 127 people in Milwaukee County, and more than half of those deaths are African-American. Williams lives just a few blocks from St. Joseph's on Milwaukee's north side, an area that's been hit particularly hard.
The message has been shared so many times, but Williams can't stress it enough: stay home.
The message has been shared so many times, but Williams can't stress it enough: stay home.
"They be ending up in the hospital with that thing down their throat that I had for two weeks, and now I'm out" Williams said. "They don’t want to go through what I just went through."
"They be ending up in the hospital with that thing down their throat that I had for two weeks, and now I'm out" Williams said. "They don’t want to go through what I just went through."
"They be ending up in the hospital with that thing down their throat that I had for two weeks, and now I'm out" Williams said. "They don’t want to go through what I just went through."
8:51 p.m. -- Waukesha County to host virtual job, resource fair
8:51 p.m. -- Waukesha County to host virtual job, resource fair
On May 7, employers and job seekers will be able to take part in a southeast Wisconsin virtual job and resource fair.
On May 7, employers and job seekers will be able to take part in a southeast Wisconsin virtual job and resource fair.
From 11 a.m. until 3 p.m., participants will be able to take part in a searchable job board and resume database, one-on-one interviews, and small group chat options.
From 11 a.m. until 3 p.m., participants will be able to take part in a searchable job board and resume database, one-on-one interviews, and small group chat options.
During this global pandemic, virtual job fairs are gaining popularity. The fair will feel very similar to a traditional job fair. It will just be moved to an online platform.
During this global pandemic, virtual job fairs are gaining popularity. The fair will feel very similar to a traditional job fair. It will just be moved to an online platform.
The Waukesha-Ozaukee-Washington Workforce Development Board and Centers, Employ Milwaukee, the Southeastern Wisconsin Workforce Development Board, and their partners are putting on this event to help those struggling financially during this Safer at Home order.
The Waukesha-Ozaukee-Washington Workforce Development Board and Centers, Employ Milwaukee, the Southeastern Wisconsin Workforce Development Board, and their partners are putting on this event to help those struggling financially during this Safer at Home order.
"We understand that there are many individuals and businesses impacted by this pandemic. We want to support them during this time and provide an opportunity to connect with in-demand employment opportunities and local resources," said Laura Catherman, WOW Workforce Development Board Director.
"We understand that there are many individuals and businesses impacted by this pandemic. We want to support them during this time and provide an opportunity to connect with in-demand employment opportunities and local resources," said Laura Catherman, WOW Workforce Development Board Director.
Local businesses will also be able to find local resources that can assist them during this time. Community-based organizations are also allowed to join in on the event.
Local businesses will also be able to find local resources that can assist them during this time. Community-based organizations are also allowed to join in on the event.
"There is a critical need to fill essential, in-demand positions, particularly in healthcare, grocery, delivery and logistics, and more," said Paul Farrow, Waukesha County Executive. "The virtual job and resource fair will provide a safe and convenient way for businesses to connect with job seekers."
"There is a critical need to fill essential, in-demand positions, particularly in healthcare, grocery, delivery and logistics, and more," said Paul Farrow, Waukesha County Executive. "The virtual job and resource fair will provide a safe and convenient way for businesses to connect with job seekers."
To learn more and register for this event, click here.
To learn more and register for this event, click here.
To learn more and register for this event, click here.
6:47 p.m. -- 'Everyone who needs a test should get a test': Leaders make major push to increase COVID-19 testing
6:47 p.m. -- 'Everyone who needs a test should get a test': Leaders make major push to increase COVID-19 testing
"Testing" is a word we hear over and over again from officials, saying it's one of the keys to getting us out of the COVID-19 pandemic and reopening the economy.
"Testing" is a word we hear over and over again from officials, saying it's one of the keys to getting us out of the COVID-19 pandemic and reopening the economy.
Now state and local leaders are making a significant push to increase testing in Wisconsin.
Now state and local leaders are making a significant push to increase testing in Wisconsin.
According to officials, the more people we can test, the better we can understand the spread of COVID-19.
According to officials, the more people we can test, the better we can understand the spread of COVID-19.
Milwaukee Mayor Tom Barrett said we should expect to see more testing in the city in the coming days and weeks.
Milwaukee Mayor Tom Barrett said we should expect to see more testing in the city in the coming days and weeks.
"If we don't have that testing, then we're flying an airplane in the dark," Barrett said. "We think that community testing is going to be critical for us to be able to find out how quickly we can get the economy back on track."
"If we don't have that testing, then we're flying an airplane in the dark," Barrett said. "We think that community testing is going to be critical for us to be able to find out how quickly we can get the economy back on track."
However, we're not at the point where everyone can get a test because we continue to lack testing supplies and personal protective equipment.
However, we're not at the point where everyone can get a test because we continue to lack testing supplies and personal protective equipment.
On Monday, Governor Tony Evers said the state is doing everything it can to get there.
On Monday, Governor Tony Evers said the state is doing everything it can to get there.
"Everyone who needs a test should get a test," Evers said.
"Everyone who needs a test should get a test," Evers said.
"Everyone who needs a test should get a test," Evers said.
At both the state and local levels, there are new efforts to sustain and expand the system of testing for both those with critical and mild symptoms.
At both the state and local levels, there are new efforts to sustain and expand the system of testing for both those with critical and mild symptoms.
The governor has a goal of conducting 85,000 tests per week, 12,000 tests per day, and hopes to reach it through many efforts already in the works.
The governor has a goal of conducting 85,000 tests per week, 12,000 tests per day, and hopes to reach it through many efforts already in the works.
He announced plans to receive hundreds of thousands of supplies from a variety of health partners to help fill the gap in resources.
He announced plans to receive hundreds of thousands of supplies from a variety of health partners to help fill the gap in resources.
He announced plans to receive hundreds of thousands of supplies from a variety of health partners to help fill the gap in resources.
6:13 p.m. -- 'Wisconsinites Against Excessive Quarantine' founder urges Gov. Evers to reopen economy
6:13 p.m. -- 'Wisconsinites Against Excessive Quarantine' founder urges Gov. Evers to reopen economy
Frustrations over Governor Evers' Safer at Home order extension continued to grow Monday among those who are fighting to get back to work.
Frustrations over Governor Evers' Safer at Home order extension continued to grow Monday among those who are fighting to get back to work.
A Facebook group called 'Wisconsinites Against Excessive Quarantine' has surpassed 100,000 members.
A Facebook group called 'Wisconsinites Against Excessive Quarantine' has surpassed 100,000 members.
The group wants all non-essential businesses to be able to reopen immediately by taking what they call common-sense safety precautions. Gov. Evers said the state has a long way to go in terms of coronavirus cases before that becomes a reality.
The group wants all non-essential businesses to be able to reopen immediately by taking what they call common-sense safety precautions. Gov. Evers said the state has a long way to go in terms of coronavirus cases before that becomes a reality.
"For Gov. Evers to sit here and extend and extend and extend, most of these small businesses, so many of them are not going to reopen their doors when this is over," said Ben Dorr.
"For Gov. Evers to sit here and extend and extend and extend, most of these small businesses, so many of them are not going to reopen their doors when this is over," said Ben Dorr.
Dorr said he launched the 'Wisconsinites Against Excessive Quarantine' Facebook page to give a voice to those who aren't able to work. In just five days, the number of members in the group climbed into the six figures.
Dorr said he launched the 'Wisconsinites Against Excessive Quarantine' Facebook page to give a voice to those who aren't able to work. In just five days, the number of members in the group climbed into the six figures.
"You're seeing the comments sections, thousands and thousands of Wisconsin citizens who are having their small businesses destroyed, their livelihoods destroyed," Dorr said.
"You're seeing the comments sections, thousands and thousands of Wisconsin citizens who are having their small businesses destroyed, their livelihoods destroyed," Dorr said.
"You're seeing the comments sections, thousands and thousands of Wisconsin citizens who are having their small businesses destroyed, their livelihoods destroyed," Dorr said.
5:37 p.m. -- Tips for getting help during economic hard times
5:37 p.m. -- Tips for getting help during economic hard times
Getting through these tough economic times can be quite challenging for many of us.
Getting through these tough economic times can be quite challenging for many of us.
Though many are hoping that unemployment and stimulus checks will arrive soon, this may not completely solve some financial issues. If you are struggling, here are a few things that you can do to help you through these tough times:
Though many are hoping that unemployment and stimulus checks will arrive soon, this may not completely solve some financial issues. If you are struggling, here are a few things that you can do to help you through these tough times:
If paying rent or your mortgage creates a hardship, contact your landlord or mortgage company to make arrangements. Recent government emergency orders may provide protection from eviction or foreclosure for at least 60 days.
If you are struggling to pay credit card, medical or loan payments, reach out to these companies as well. Many businesses will work with you to offer extra time or other payment arrangements.
If you are struggling to pay credit card, medical or loan payments, reach out to these companies as well. Many businesses will work with you to offer extra time or other payment arrangements.
If you need help with food, utility bills, or other needs, call 211. This is a great resource for connecting you with food pantries, energy assistance, and other programs that can help you to get through these difficult times. Our Call 4 Action office is also available to assist with referrals, education, and mediation.
If you need help with food, utility bills, or other needs, call 211. This is a great resource for connecting you with food pantries, energy assistance, and other programs that can help you to get through these difficult times. Our Call 4 Action office is also available to assist with referrals, education, and mediation.
If you need help with food, utility bills, or other needs, call 211. This is a great resource for connecting you with food pantries, energy assistance, and other programs that can help you to get through these difficult times. Our Call 4 Action office is also available to assist with referrals, education, and mediation.
5:33 p.m. -- 'You can't quarantine creativity': Thiensville pottery store 'Glaze' offering to-go pottery kits
5:33 p.m. -- 'You can't quarantine creativity': Thiensville pottery store 'Glaze' offering to-go pottery kits
A local pottery store is making sure Mom still gets a gift this upcoming Mother's Day.
A local pottery store is making sure Mom still gets a gift this upcoming Mother's Day.
Glaze in Thiensville is offering to-go pottery kits. You can choose from hundreds of pieces of pottery and the glaze to go with it. Kits also include paint brushes and some Cedar Crest ice cream.
Glaze in Thiensville is offering to-go pottery kits. You can choose from hundreds of pieces of pottery and the glaze to go with it. Kits also include paint brushes and some Cedar Crest ice cream.
You place your order over the phone and pick it up on the curb. Paint your pottery at home and return it later for firing.
You place your order over the phone and pick it up on the curb. Paint your pottery at home and return it later for firing.
Owner Kristina Eckert started Glaze nearly 16 years ago. She says it was always her dream to paint pottery all day.
Owner Kristina Eckert started Glaze nearly 16 years ago. She says it was always her dream to paint pottery all day.
"We bring creativity to the community," she said. "We're all about connecting with people and showing the fun projects they can make."
"We bring creativity to the community," she said. "We're all about connecting with people and showing the fun projects they can make."
Before the Safer at Home order, Kristina had a staff of 20. Now she manages the business with just two people at a time.
Before the Safer at Home order, Kristina had a staff of 20. Now she manages the business with just two people at a time.
She recognizes the importance arts and crafts has on the community, saying "You can't quarantine creativity. Being creative can really help with your mental health."
She recognizes the importance arts and crafts has on the community, saying "You can't quarantine creativity. Being creative can really help with your mental health."
Kristina says gnomes, unicorns and turtles are some of their best pottery sellers. Right now Glaze is also offering Wine and Design kit that includes a bottle of wine. They are also encouraging people to paint with friends over Zoom.
Kristina says gnomes, unicorns and turtles are some of their best pottery sellers. Right now Glaze is also offering Wine and Design kit that includes a bottle of wine. They are also encouraging people to paint with friends over Zoom.
Facebook Page
Website
Website
Place orders over the phone: (262) 238-5456.
Place orders over the phone: (262) 238-5456.
Glaze is open seven days a week, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Glaze is open seven days a week, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
5:24 p.m. -- Joe Biden: Dr. Anthony Fauci should be 'only person' public hears from during COVID-19 crisis
5:24 p.m. -- Joe Biden: Dr. Anthony Fauci should be 'only person' public hears from during COVID-19 crisis
In an interview with TMJ4's Charles Benson, Former Vice President Joe Biden said Dr. Anthony Fauci is the only White House official the public should hear from.
In an interview with TMJ4's Charles Benson, Former Vice President Joe Biden said Dr. Anthony Fauci is the only White House official the public should hear from.
Benson had the opportunity to sit down on a Zoom call with the presumptive Democrative nominee for president and ask him a few questions. They addressed the DNC, coronavirus' affect on African Americans, and re-opening Wisonsin's economy.
Benson had the opportunity to sit down on a Zoom call with the presumptive Democrative nominee for president and ask him a few questions. They addressed the DNC, coronavirus' affect on African Americans, and re-opening Wisonsin's economy.
In the interview, Biden hinted that it was not yet time to re-open Wisconsin.
In the interview, Biden hinted that it was not yet time to re-open Wisconsin.
"The hospitals in Milwaukee have less than a week’s supply of things they need," said Biden. "There are three things that need to happen: testing, tracking, and treatment."
"The hospitals in Milwaukee have less than a week’s supply of things they need," said Biden. "There are three things that need to happen: testing, tracking, and treatment."
He also addressed the fact that this virus is hitting the African American community especially hard. According to Biden, no one should have to pay for a test, especially people in historically underrepresented communities. He also added that it's especially important to "keep a clear, clear, ledger of what’s going on in minority communities."
He also addressed the fact that this virus is hitting the African American community especially hard. According to Biden, no one should have to pay for a test, especially people in historically underrepresented communities. He also added that it's especially important to "keep a clear, clear, ledger of what’s going on in minority communities."
Biden wrapped up the interview by addressing the way our federal government is currently handling the COVID-19 pandemic.
Biden wrapped up the interview by addressing the way our federal government is currently handling the COVID-19 pandemic.
“We’d all be better off if the only person we heard from from the White House was Dr. Fauci," said Biden.
“We’d all be better off if the only person we heard from from the White House was Dr. Fauci," said Biden.
He mentioned that the president should not be hosting these long press conferences daily.
He mentioned that the president should not be hosting these long press conferences daily.
"Follow the science," said Biden. "We're taking too much time."
"Follow the science," said Biden. "We're taking too much time."
"President Trump has led a decisive and aggressive approach against the coronavirus since January, and he continues to prioritize the health and safety of the American people, especially our most vulnerable," Trump Victory Spokesperson Anna Kelly wrote in a statement.
"President Trump has led a decisive and aggressive approach against the coronavirus since January, and he continues to prioritize the health and safety of the American people, especially our most vulnerable," Trump Victory Spokesperson Anna Kelly wrote in a statement.
4:15 p.m. -- Foxconn to make thousands of face masks to reduce spread of COVID-19
4:15 p.m. -- Foxconn to make thousands of face masks to reduce spread of COVID-19
Foxconn Technology Group (Foxconn) has announced they are making thousands of face masks to stop the spread of COVID-19 across the U.S. and the state of Wisconsin.
Foxconn Technology Group (Foxconn) has announced they are making thousands of face masks to stop the spread of COVID-19 across the U.S. and the state of Wisconsin.
The company has begun making procedural masks in Mount Pleasant under the brand Sharp, which is owned by Foxconn. Medical professionals, law enforcement, pharmacists, caregivers, and others can use the masks Foxconn will create.
The company has begun making procedural masks in Mount Pleasant under the brand Sharp, which is owned by Foxconn. Medical professionals, law enforcement, pharmacists, caregivers, and others can use the masks Foxconn will create.
"Foxconn's founder, Terry Gou, has heard the call from federal and state elected leaders for industries and businesses to pull together their resources and do their part in the fight against COVID-19," said Dr. Jay Lee, Board Member and Vice-Chairman of Foxconn Technology Group. "Whether it is consumer electronics, industrial Artificial Intelligence, display technology, high-performance computing, 5G networks, or procedural masks, Foxconn's manufacturing expertise, global supply-chain reach, and agility is working to save lives."
"Foxconn's founder, Terry Gou, has heard the call from federal and state elected leaders for industries and businesses to pull together their resources and do their part in the fight against COVID-19," said Dr. Jay Lee, Board Member and Vice-Chairman of Foxconn Technology Group. "Whether it is consumer electronics, industrial Artificial Intelligence, display technology, high-performance computing, 5G networks, or procedural masks, Foxconn's manufacturing expertise, global supply-chain reach, and agility is working to save lives."
The company says they're following Gov. Evers' "Safer at Home" order and CDC prevention guidelines by asking certain employees to work from home. Other employees are going through safety protocols and procedures, which include the use of personal protective equipment.
The company says they're following Gov. Evers' "Safer at Home" order and CDC prevention guidelines by asking certain employees to work from home. Other employees are going through safety protocols and procedures, which include the use of personal protective equipment.
Foxconn is also working with Medtronic, a U.S.-based medical technology provider, on an initiative to produce medical ventilators in Wisconsin. Medical and technical experts from both companies are researching and developing production processes so additional ventilators can be quickly produced to fight the current global pandemic.
Foxconn is also working with Medtronic, a U.S.-based medical technology provider, on an initiative to produce medical ventilators in Wisconsin. Medical and technical experts from both companies are researching and developing production processes so additional ventilators can be quickly produced to fight the current global pandemic.
3:32 p.m. -- Dairy farms to receive help after weeks of milk dumping
3:32 p.m. -- Dairy farms to receive help after weeks of milk dumping
After weeks of dumping milk, the dairy industry will receive government aid from the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA).
After weeks of dumping milk, the dairy industry will receive government aid from the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA).
The USDA announced a $19 billion relief program to help farmers and ranchers across the country. The dairy industry will be part of a $3 billion package aimed at assisting fresh produce, dairy, and meat industries.
The USDA announced a $19 billion relief program to help farmers and ranchers across the country. The dairy industry will be part of a $3 billion package aimed at assisting fresh produce, dairy, and meat industries.
For farms like Sunset Dairy Farm, it's a welcomed relief package after dumping over 10,000 gallons of milk for the last two weeks.
For farms like Sunset Dairy Farm, it's a welcomed relief package after dumping over 10,000 gallons of milk for the last two weeks.
"It's not just frustrating for [the consumer], it's frustrating on our end," Karen Hughes, Herd Manager for Sunset Dairy Farm, said. "The biggest thing was the shift in demand overnight. It was going to restaurants and schools, and now a lot of people are doing their grocery shopping, and the shelves and stores aren't full. It's frustrating to go shopping for the kids, and the milk, the yogurt, and butter isn't there like it was before."
"It's not just frustrating for [the consumer], it's frustrating on our end," Karen Hughes, Herd Manager for Sunset Dairy Farm, said. "The biggest thing was the shift in demand overnight. It was going to restaurants and schools, and now a lot of people are doing their grocery shopping, and the shelves and stores aren't full. It's frustrating to go shopping for the kids, and the milk, the yogurt, and butter isn't there like it was before."
As a sixth-generation dairy farmer, Hughes says she's never had to dump milk. So when she saw community efforts to help in the rebound, it provides optimism in a struggling market. Last week, The Hunger Task Force committed $1 million to help buy back milk for food pantries.
As a sixth-generation dairy farmer, Hughes says she's never had to dump milk. So when she saw community efforts to help in the rebound, it provides optimism in a struggling market. Last week, The Hunger Task Force committed $1 million to help buy back milk for food pantries.
"It will help," Hughes said. "It may not be a huge effect, but every little bit helps."
"It will help," Hughes said. "It may not be a huge effect, but every little bit helps."
Read the full story here.
Read the full story here.
1:57 p.m. -- Gov. Tony Evers announces 'Badger Bounce Back' plan with phased approach to reopening state
1:57 p.m. -- Gov. Tony Evers announces 'Badger Bounce Back' plan with phased approach to reopening state
Governor Evers announced the "Badger Bounce Back Program" on Monday, a phased plan that will guide Wisconsin toward reopening its economy.
Governor Evers announced the "Badger Bounce Back Program" on Monday, a phased plan that will guide Wisconsin toward reopening its economy.
The plan has three distinct phases that will gradually allow Wisconsin to get back to normal. It also sets specific requirements necessary to progress through those phases.
The plan has three distinct phases that will gradually allow Wisconsin to get back to normal. It also sets specific requirements necessary to progress through those phases.
"Right now, Wisconsin does not meet the criteria the White House established to start reopening our state," Gov. Evers said Monday. "But with our Badger Bounce Back plan, we're going to be taking some important steps to get us there."
"Right now, Wisconsin does not meet the criteria the White House established to start reopening our state," Gov. Evers said Monday. "But with our Badger Bounce Back plan, we're going to be taking some important steps to get us there."
In order to advance to a new phase in the plan, Evers says Wisconsin must report a decrease in daily cases and symptoms reported for 14 straight days - also known as a 'downward trajectory.'
In order to advance to a new phase in the plan, Evers says Wisconsin must report a decrease in daily cases and symptoms reported for 14 straight days - also known as a 'downward trajectory.'
Here are the phases as explained in the governor's order:
Here are the phases as explained in the governor's order:
Here are the phases as explained in the governor's order:

The governor says the goal of the program is to decrease cases and deaths to a low level, and increase capacity in our healthcare system.
"Anyone who needs a test should get it," Evers said at a briefing Monday. The state has set a goal of 85,000 tests per week, meaning 12,000 per day.
"Anyone who needs a test should get it," Evers said at a briefing Monday. The state has set a goal of 85,000 tests per week, meaning 12,000 per day.
The governor released more information on the expansion of testing earlier on Monday. That information can be found here.
The governor released more information on the expansion of testing earlier on Monday. That information can be found here.
Under the Badger Bounce Back Program, the state also plans to more aggressively track the spread of the virus, with the goal of interviewing everyone who tests positive within 24 hours of receiving their test result. Anyone they came in contact with will hopefully then be interviewed within 48 hours.
Under the Badger Bounce Back Program, the state also plans to more aggressively track the spread of the virus, with the goal of interviewing everyone who tests positive within 24 hours of receiving their test result. Anyone they came in contact with will hopefully then be interviewed within 48 hours.
The state is pursuing every avenue when it comes to gaining more personal protective equipment. They are also working to expand the healthcare system capacity.
The state is pursuing every avenue when it comes to gaining more personal protective equipment. They are also working to expand the healthcare system capacity.
According to the press release, "When the state has seen these efforts be successful, Wisconsin can begin to turn the dial, re-open the state, and get businesses and workers back on their feet."
According to the press release, "When the state has seen these efforts be successful, Wisconsin can begin to turn the dial, re-open the state, and get businesses and workers back on their feet."
1:18 p.m. -- Local nonprofit that serves homeless community in need of supplies during COVID-19 pandemic
1:18 p.m. -- Local nonprofit that serves homeless community in need of supplies during COVID-19 pandemic
Pastor James West is the executive director of Repairers of the Breach, a non-profit daytime refuge for those who are homeless.
Pastor James West is the executive director of Repairers of the Breach, a non-profit daytime refuge for those who are homeless.
Things have changed inside the organization’s building due to COVID-19, chairs are spaced farther apart, surfaces are wiped down frequently and visitors are wearing face masks, but despite all the changes, their mission remains the same, to offer life-restoring services.
Things have changed inside the organization’s building due to COVID-19, chairs are spaced farther apart, surfaces are wiped down frequently and visitors are wearing face masks, but despite all the changes, their mission remains the same, to offer life-restoring services.
“We are still giving people who are homeless a place to take a load off and rest and still feeding and giving showers and allowing people to use the phone all while social distancing,” said Pastor West.
“We are still giving people who are homeless a place to take a load off and rest and still feeding and giving showers and allowing people to use the phone all while social distancing,” said Pastor West.
“We are still giving people who are homeless a place to take a load off and rest and still feeding and giving showers and allowing people to use the phone all while social distancing,” said Pastor West.

Local nonprofit that serves homeless in need of supplies

The organization still sees about 100 homeless men and women entering their doors and costs are adding up and supplies are depleting.
The organization still sees about 100 homeless men and women entering their doors and costs are adding up and supplies are depleting.
“We have someone just to wipe down the showers when everyone gets out," said Pastor West. "It get expensive and who could budget for this? We are paying overtime, giving bonuses to the staff and making sure that they are not neglecting their family by serving someone else."
“We have someone just to wipe down the showers when everyone gets out," said Pastor West. "It get expensive and who could budget for this? We are paying overtime, giving bonuses to the staff and making sure that they are not neglecting their family by serving someone else."
Read the full story here.
Read the full story here.
Read the full story here.
12:46 p.m. -- Gov. Tony Evers to announce 'Badger Bounce Back Program' Monday
12:46 p.m. -- Gov. Tony Evers to announce 'Badger Bounce Back Program' Monday
Governor Evers is expected to announce a new "Badger Bounce Back Program" Monday afternoon during a briefing with the state Department of Health Services.
Governor Evers is expected to announce a new "Badger Bounce Back Program" Monday afternoon during a briefing with the state Department of Health Services.
According to two sources familiar with Evers' call with Wisconsin CEOs earlier Monday, the program will focus on testing and tracing the virus within the state.
According to two sources familiar with Evers' call with Wisconsin CEOs earlier Monday, the program will focus on testing and tracing the virus within the state.
Also on Monday, Evers announced several initiatives that will increase testing around Wisconsin and allow for more labs to process those tests.
Also on Monday, Evers announced several initiatives that will increase testing around Wisconsin and allow for more labs to process those tests.
Evers' administration says government officials have been working closely with private companies in order to expand testing. He said the number of testing labs in the state has expanded from just eight to today's number of 36 in the span of a month.
Evers' administration says government officials have been working closely with private companies in order to expand testing. He said the number of testing labs in the state has expanded from just eight to today's number of 36 in the span of a month.
One of the initiatives Evers' announced Monday was 250,000 additional test collection supplies, which are expected to arrive in the coming weeks.
One of the initiatives Evers' announced Monday was 250,000 additional test collection supplies, which are expected to arrive in the coming weeks.
The DHS briefing is scheduled for 1:30 p.m. and will be carried live on TMJ4 News and TMJ4.com.
The DHS briefing is scheduled for 1:30 p.m. and will be carried live on TMJ4 News and TMJ4.com.
The DHS briefing is scheduled for 1:30 p.m. and will be carried live on TMJ4 News and TMJ4.com.
11:53 a.m. -- Froedtert: Plasma treatment looks hopeful for critically ill COVID-19 patients
11:53 a.m. -- Froedtert: Plasma treatment looks hopeful for critically ill COVID-19 patients
Froedtert & the Medical College of Wisconsin say a new plasma treatment is offering hope to critically ill COVID-19 patients.
Froedtert & the Medical College of Wisconsin say a new plasma treatment is offering hope to critically ill COVID-19 patients.
Froedtert & MCW is the first health care system in southeastern Wisconsin to administer the convalescent plasma therapy to COVID-19 patients. The first patient was treated on April 8, and there are now a total of four patients who are undergoing treatment.
Froedtert & MCW is the first health care system in southeastern Wisconsin to administer the convalescent plasma therapy to COVID-19 patients. The first patient was treated on April 8, and there are now a total of four patients who are undergoing treatment.
The treatment involves using the plasma from patients who have recovered from COVID-19. Antibodies are extracted from the plasma of people who have recovered from the virus and are then infused into the patients who are currently battling in order to help their immune systems fight the coronavirus.
The treatment involves using the plasma from patients who have recovered from COVID-19. Antibodies are extracted from the plasma of people who have recovered from the virus and are then infused into the patients who are currently battling in order to help their immune systems fight the coronavirus.
"Based upon work with these active cases, we have great hope for this research because it offers a new treatment for the most severely affected patients, those for whom all other options are not working," said, Mary Beth Graham, MD, Associate Chief of the Division of Infectious Disease at MCW, Medical Director of Infection Prevention & Control at Froedtert Hospital, and co-principal investigator on the study
"Based upon work with these active cases, we have great hope for this research because it offers a new treatment for the most severely affected patients, those for whom all other options are not working," said, Mary Beth Graham, MD, Associate Chief of the Division of Infectious Disease at MCW, Medical Director of Infection Prevention & Control at Froedtert Hospital, and co-principal investigator on the study
One donation of plasma allows multiple patients to be treated, as well as aids patients who are undergoing treatment as some of them may need more than one plasma transfusion.
One donation of plasma allows multiple patients to be treated, as well as aids patients who are undergoing treatment as some of them may need more than one plasma transfusion.
Froedtert & MCW has seen success with convalescent plasma treatments in the past for battling viruses such as Ebola and H1N1.
Froedtert & MCW has seen success with convalescent plasma treatments in the past for battling viruses such as Ebola and H1N1.
Individuals who have recovered from COVID-19 and would like to participate in the study can call 1-866-702-HOPE or go online. FDA guidelines require potential donors to have had a laboratory confirmed case of COVID-19, be symptom free for at least 14 days prior to donating and be tested again and receive a negative diagnosis.
Individuals who have recovered from COVID-19 and would like to participate in the study can call 1-866-702-HOPE or go online. FDA guidelines require potential donors to have had a laboratory confirmed case of COVID-19, be symptom free for at least 14 days prior to donating and be tested again and receive a negative diagnosis.
Individuals who have recovered from COVID-19 and would like to participate in the study can call 1-866-702-HOPE or go online. FDA guidelines require potential donors to have had a laboratory confirmed case of COVID-19, be symptom free for at least 14 days prior to donating and be tested again and receive a negative diagnosis.
11:24 a.m. -- Dodge County Sheriff requests that Evers re-evaluate Safer at Home order extension
11:24 a.m. -- Dodge County Sheriff requests that Evers re-evaluate Safer at Home order extension
The Dodge County Sheriff spoke out on Saturday regarding Gov. Tony Evers' Safer at Home order, requesting that Evers re-evaluate the situation.
The Dodge County Sheriff spoke out on Saturday regarding Gov. Tony Evers' Safer at Home order, requesting that Evers re-evaluate the situation.
Sheriff Dale Schmidt voiced his concerns in the Sheriff's Column which was posted on Facebook Saturday morning. Within that column, he addresses issues that his community currently faces regarding the COVID-19 pandemic.
Sheriff Dale Schmidt voiced his concerns in the Sheriff's Column which was posted on Facebook Saturday morning. Within that column, he addresses issues that his community currently faces regarding the COVID-19 pandemic.
Sheriff Schmidt wrote that several lawsuits will likely be filed later this week from citizens who claim the Safer at Home order infringes upon their constitutional rights.
Sheriff Schmidt wrote that several lawsuits will likely be filed later this week from citizens who claim the Safer at Home order infringes upon their constitutional rights.
He said he has been concerned with the constitutionality of the order since the beginning. Because of these concerns, he directed all of his deputies to contact him before closing a business or making an arrest in relation to the order.
He said he has been concerned with the constitutionality of the order since the beginning. Because of these concerns, he directed all of his deputies to contact him before closing a business or making an arrest in relation to the order.
Sheriff Schmidt wrote, "My intent with my order was to evaluate each incident individually to ensure no constitutional rights were infringed upon by actions of the Dodge County Sheriff’s Office."
Sheriff Schmidt wrote, "My intent with my order was to evaluate each incident individually to ensure no constitutional rights were infringed upon by actions of the Dodge County Sheriff’s Office."
The sheriff also stated that he has been in contact with state officials in an effort to make sure his citizens are safe from both the virus and any orders that may be unconstitutional.
The sheriff also stated that he has been in contact with state officials in an effort to make sure his citizens are safe from both the virus and any orders that may be unconstitutional.
Finally, at the end of his column, Sheriff Schmidt addressed Gov. Evers directly. He requested that Evers' re-evaluate the Safer at Home order, and eliminate any orders that infringe upon constitutional rights.
Finally, at the end of his column, Sheriff Schmidt addressed Gov. Evers directly. He requested that Evers' re-evaluate the Safer at Home order, and eliminate any orders that infringe upon constitutional rights.
Sheriff Schmidt wrote, "You are standing in the minority in your position to close down our state through the end of May. Even the neighboring states in which you relied on to make your decision are opening their economies well before the end of May."
Sheriff Schmidt wrote, "You are standing in the minority in your position to close down our state through the end of May. Even the neighboring states in which you relied on to make your decision are opening their economies well before the end of May."
Sheriff Schmidt is one of two sheriffs in the state to speak out against the extension of the order. Racine County Sheriff Christopher Schmaling suggested that his department will no longer enforce the order.
Sheriff Schmidt is one of two sheriffs in the state to speak out against the extension of the order. Racine County Sheriff Christopher Schmaling suggested that his department will no longer enforce the order.
Sheriff Schmidt is one of two sheriffs in the state to speak out against the extension of the order. Racine County Sheriff Christopher Schmaling suggested that his department will no longer enforce the order.
10:33 a.m. -- 'Safer at Home is working': Gov. Tony Evers reinforces message behind Safer at Home extension
10:33 a.m. -- 'Safer at Home is working': Gov. Tony Evers reinforces message behind Safer at Home extension
Gov. Tony Evers on Monday shared a video on social media reinforcing the message behind his Safer at Home extension.
Gov. Tony Evers on Monday shared a video on social media reinforcing the message behind his Safer at Home extension.
In the video, titled 'Let's Get This Done Together,' Evers says, "Wisconsinites, I am once again calling on you to rise to the challenge. Safer at Home is working. We have reduced cases, prevented hospitalizations, and saved lives. So let’s get this done together."
In the video, titled 'Let's Get This Done Together,' Evers says, "Wisconsinites, I am once again calling on you to rise to the challenge. Safer at Home is working. We have reduced cases, prevented hospitalizations, and saved lives. So let’s get this done together."
Evers has faced backlash from some after extending the Safer at Home order through May 26. Protests have been held in both Brookfield and Madison in disapproval of the extension that was originally set to expire on April 24.
Evers has faced backlash from some after extending the Safer at Home order through May 26. Protests have been held in both Brookfield and Madison in disapproval of the extension that was originally set to expire on April 24.
Republicans in the state legislature have said they will appeal to the state's Supreme Court to block the order.
Republicans in the state legislature have said they will appeal to the state's Supreme Court to block the order.
"The governor passed his authority over to the secretary of health and human services and she basically is a bureaucrat who does not have jurisdictions over the legislature," said State Senator Alberta Darling. "We are the elected officials and she has bypassed our role. Usually what happens when a secretary has a policy, she has to run it through our rules process, have hearings, and run it through it our rules committee and have it approved by the legislature. He's totally disregarded that oversight and that's automatically wrong. I don't want a bureaucrat telling me how to shut down business and how to stay in my home. "
"The governor passed his authority over to the secretary of health and human services and she basically is a bureaucrat who does not have jurisdictions over the legislature," said State Senator Alberta Darling. "We are the elected officials and she has bypassed our role. Usually what happens when a secretary has a policy, she has to run it through our rules process, have hearings, and run it through it our rules committee and have it approved by the legislature. He's totally disregarded that oversight and that's automatically wrong. I don't want a bureaucrat telling me how to shut down business and how to stay in my home. "
Earlier Monday, The Tavern League of Wisconsin urged Evers to consider a soft reopening of restaurants, taverns and supper clubs in the state on May 1.
Earlier Monday, The Tavern League of Wisconsin urged Evers to consider a soft reopening of restaurants, taverns and supper clubs in the state on May 1.
"On May 26th, when the current Stay at Home Order ends, the challenges facing Wisconsin in fighting the Coronavirus will essentially be the same as they are today, with no vaccine available," said the Tavern League in a press release. "According to experts, a vaccine will not be widely available for 12 to 18 months. Wisconsinites cannot live under a Stay at Home Order for the next 12 to 18 months."
"On May 26th, when the current Stay at Home Order ends, the challenges facing Wisconsin in fighting the Coronavirus will essentially be the same as they are today, with no vaccine available," said the Tavern League in a press release. "According to experts, a vaccine will not be widely available for 12 to 18 months. Wisconsinites cannot live under a Stay at Home Order for the next 12 to 18 months."
The group is recommending a reopening that includes continuing social distancing and other guidelines in place during the coronavirus pandemic.
The group is recommending a reopening that includes continuing social distancing and other guidelines in place during the coronavirus pandemic.
Those include:
Those include:
Those include:

  • All employees required to wear masks and gloves
  • All tables 6-feet apart
  • Practice social distancing of 6-feet
  • No more than six people per table
  • Eliminate table condiments and paper menus
  • No salad bars or self-serve buffets
  • Reduce on-premise capacity by 50%

9:57 a.m. -- Racine Co. unveils housing plan to support hospitals, essential workers, residents with special needs
9:57 a.m. -- Racine Co. unveils housing plan to support hospitals, essential workers, residents with special needs
In response to the COVID-19 outbreak, the Racine County Emergency Operations Center announced a housing plan to support hospitals, essential workers, and residents with special needs.
In response to the COVID-19 outbreak, the Racine County Emergency Operations Center announced a housing plan to support hospitals, essential workers, and residents with special needs.
“Racine County has again come together to help ensure our communities are prepared for all scenarios as the COVID-19 outbreak continues to unfold,” County Executive Jonathan Delagrave said. “This plan will help us keep those working on the front lines healthy, ensure our health care systems can provide care to all who need it, and give those with special needs a place to go to prevent further spread of COVID-19.”
“Racine County has again come together to help ensure our communities are prepared for all scenarios as the COVID-19 outbreak continues to unfold,” County Executive Jonathan Delagrave said. “This plan will help us keep those working on the front lines healthy, ensure our health care systems can provide care to all who need it, and give those with special needs a place to go to prevent further spread of COVID-19.”
The plan unveiled Sunday includes the following components:
The plan unveiled Sunday includes the following components:
Hospital overflow: Local officials are partnering with the Wisconsin Emergency Operations Center to allow Racine County hospitals to utilize the overflow site under development at Wisconsin State Fair Park, if local hospitals reach capacity.
Hospital overflow: Local officials are partnering with the Wisconsin Emergency Operations Center to allow Racine County hospitals to utilize the overflow site under development at Wisconsin State Fair Park, if local hospitals reach capacity.
Hospital overflow: Local officials are partnering with the Wisconsin Emergency Operations Center to allow Racine County hospitals to utilize the overflow site under development at Wisconsin State Fair Park, if local hospitals reach capacity.

New covid-19 housing plan in Racine

Essential workers: Hotels have been reserved in eastern, central, and western Racine County for essential workers including first responders and health care workers. Essential workers who will stay at hotels include those who cannot live at their homes due to circumstances such as a sick family member, and essential workers who become sick and need to recover in a safe, non-medical setting.
Essential workers: Hotels have been reserved in eastern, central, and western Racine County for essential workers including first responders and health care workers. Essential workers who will stay at hotels include those who cannot live at their homes due to circumstances such as a sick family member, and essential workers who become sick and need to recover in a safe, non-medical setting.
Residents with special needs: Local officials have identified an isolation center for individuals who meet the following criteria: tested positive for COVID-19 by a health care professional; need safe shelter; have been referred to the isolation center by a hospital, licensed health care provider, or public health department; are an able-bodied adult (or a minor with guardian/parent) without needing medical intervention.
Residents with special needs: Local officials have identified an isolation center for individuals who meet the following criteria: tested positive for COVID-19 by a health care professional; need safe shelter; have been referred to the isolation center by a hospital, licensed health care provider, or public health department; are an able-bodied adult (or a minor with guardian/parent) without needing medical intervention.
All referrals will be coordinated through a central referral line managed by the Racine County Human Services Department. The site is expected to be announced soon.
All referrals will be coordinated through a central referral line managed by the Racine County Human Services Department. The site is expected to be announced soon.
“We are so grateful for the tireless work of our health care workers, public health departments, first responders, and many other community partners from across the county to mitigate the impact of COVID-19 in Racine County. Our efforts are making a difference, and we urge our communities to continue to stick together to get through this unprecedented public health emergency,” County Executive Delagrave said.
“We are so grateful for the tireless work of our health care workers, public health departments, first responders, and many other community partners from across the county to mitigate the impact of COVID-19 in Racine County. Our efforts are making a difference, and we urge our communities to continue to stick together to get through this unprecedented public health emergency,” County Executive Delagrave said.
“We are so grateful for the tireless work of our health care workers, public health departments, first responders, and many other community partners from across the county to mitigate the impact of COVID-19 in Racine County. Our efforts are making a difference, and we urge our communities to continue to stick together to get through this unprecedented public health emergency,” County Executive Delagrave said.
9:08 a.m. -- Real estate industry adapts to COVID-19 restrictions
9:08 a.m. -- Real estate industry adapts to COVID-19 restrictions
The real estate industry is one portion of Wisconsin's economy classified as essential under Gov. Tony Evers' Safer at Home order.
The real estate industry is one portion of Wisconsin's economy classified as essential under Gov. Tony Evers' Safer at Home order.
Realtor Tom Combs, a managing partner at The Combs Team LLC, said this is the first time in his almost 20-year career that health concerns have forced the industry to change how it conducts routine business.
Realtor Tom Combs, a managing partner at The Combs Team LLC, said this is the first time in his almost 20-year career that health concerns have forced the industry to change how it conducts routine business.
"The way we interact, the way we're showing houses, the way we're marketing houses, all that has definitely changed," Combs said.
"The way we interact, the way we're showing houses, the way we're marketing houses, all that has definitely changed," Combs said.
Combs said he is still conducting some in-home showings. Most buyers want to walk through a house before putting in an offer.
Combs said he is still conducting some in-home showings. Most buyers want to walk through a house before putting in an offer.
But he said the number of people allowed inside is restricted to "essential buyers" and a real estate agent.
But he said the number of people allowed inside is restricted to "essential buyers" and a real estate agent.
But he said the number of people allowed inside is restricted to "essential buyers" and a real estate agent.

Real estate industry adapts to COVID-19 restrictions

"Bringing the kids along, bringing the parents along, that's not allowed," Combs said.
He said sellers have been instructed to do things like leave lights on, and leave doors open, to minimize anyone touching things inside their homes.
He said sellers have been instructed to do things like leave lights on, and leave doors open, to minimize anyone touching things inside their homes.
"In the past, you'd never think twice about grabbing a door knob or turning on a light switch," Combs said.
"In the past, you'd never think twice about grabbing a door knob or turning on a light switch," Combs said.
Prospective buyers touring a home are also given disposable gloves, footies, and a mask.
Prospective buyers touring a home are also given disposable gloves, footies, and a mask.
Combs is also encouraging buyers to do online, 3D tours of a listing before scheduling a walk through.
Combs is also encouraging buyers to do online, 3D tours of a listing before scheduling a walk through.
"When they're going into a house, people are now more serious before they go in," he said. "Whereas before, it was often the attitude of, 'let's just go take a look.'"
"When they're going into a house, people are now more serious before they go in," he said. "Whereas before, it was often the attitude of, 'let's just go take a look.'"
Read the full story here.
Read the full story here.
Read the full story here.

Sunday, April 19
Sunday, April 19
4:15 p.m. -- Protesters rally at Wis. Capitol against stay-home order
4:15 p.m. -- Protesters rally at Wis. Capitol against stay-home order
MADISON, Wis. (Milwaukee Journal Sentinel) — Protesters gathered at the Wisconsin Capitol on Sunday to urge Gov. Tony Evers to lift his extended stay home order.
MADISON, Wis. (Milwaukee Journal Sentinel) — Protesters gathered at the Wisconsin Capitol on Sunday to urge Gov. Tony Evers to lift his extended stay home order.
The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reports about six dozen protesters rallied to call on Evers to change his mind. Last week Evers extended his stay-at-home order until after Memorial Day to help stem the spread of the coronavirus. But the demonstrators carried signs rejecting the idea that the threat of infection is worth the damage business closings are having on the economy.
The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reports about six dozen protesters rallied to call on Evers to change his mind. Last week Evers extended his stay-at-home order until after Memorial Day to help stem the spread of the coronavirus. But the demonstrators carried signs rejecting the idea that the threat of infection is worth the damage business closings are having on the economy.
Wisconsin reported nine more deaths from COVID-19 on Sunday, bringing the state's death toll to 220. The state recorded 147 new cases of the coronavirus for a total of 4,346.
Wisconsin reported nine more deaths from COVID-19 on Sunday, bringing the state's death toll to 220. The state recorded 147 new cases of the coronavirus for a total of 4,346.
Wisconsin reported nine more deaths from COVID-19 on Sunday, bringing the state's death toll to 220. The state recorded 147 new cases of the coronavirus for a total of 4,346.
3:34 p.m. -- New York Times catches up with a quarantined Christian Yelich
3:34 p.m. -- New York Times catches up with a quarantined Christian Yelich
The New York Times caught up with Christian Yelich to see what he's been up to during quarantine.
The New York Times caught up with Christian Yelich to see what he's been up to during quarantine.
With baseball on hold, Yelich has had to fill a whole lot of free time. But what has he been up to? The New York Times found out and shared his recent activities in an article on Sunday.
With baseball on hold, Yelich has had to fill a whole lot of free time. But what has he been up to? The New York Times found out and shared his recent activities in an article on Sunday.
Besides helping out medical professionals and Feeding America with his California Strong organization, Yelich hasn't been doing much.
Besides helping out medical professionals and Feeding America with his California Strong organization, Yelich hasn't been doing much.
His days probably look a lot like yours if you're not working. He's been watching Netflix, playing catch with his brother, and even got a PlayStation 4 for video games.
His days probably look a lot like yours if you're not working. He's been watching Netflix, playing catch with his brother, and even got a PlayStation 4 for video games.
"When I tell you I don’t know anything about video games, I really know nothing. I’ve heard Call of Duty is pretty cool, and obviously MLB The Show. I figure I’ve got to play as myself in a video game at least one time, right? That’s a cool perk of playing in the big leagues," said Yelich.
"When I tell you I don’t know anything about video games, I really know nothing. I’ve heard Call of Duty is pretty cool, and obviously MLB The Show. I figure I’ve got to play as myself in a video game at least one time, right? That’s a cool perk of playing in the big leagues," said Yelich.
One thing Yelich has been doing that not many people can say they've done is texting Bob Uecker. According to the New York Times, Yelich has not gotten Zoom for video chatting, but he has been texting Uecker every once in a while.
One thing Yelich has been doing that not many people can say they've done is texting Bob Uecker. According to the New York Times, Yelich has not gotten Zoom for video chatting, but he has been texting Uecker every once in a while.
"I’ve texted with Ueck a few times, but we haven’t Zoomed. He’s just hangin’, just being himself. He’s pretty funny over text, the same as he is in person. It’s a bright spot in your day whenever you get to hear from him," said Yelich.
"I’ve texted with Ueck a few times, but we haven’t Zoomed. He’s just hangin’, just being himself. He’s pretty funny over text, the same as he is in person. It’s a bright spot in your day whenever you get to hear from him," said Yelich.
Yelich also mentioned that he should be using this time to learn how to cook. While he hasn't learned yet, he said if this continues he may need to start thinking about going down that path.
Yelich also mentioned that he should be using this time to learn how to cook. While he hasn't learned yet, he said if this continues he may need to start thinking about going down that path.
New York Times reporter Tyler Kepner asked Yelich what impact baseball can have on the community when it starts back up. Here's what Yelich had to say:
New York Times reporter Tyler Kepner asked Yelich what impact baseball can have on the community when it starts back up. Here's what Yelich had to say:
"I think over the course of history you’ve seen that sports helps heal people and situations. So hopefully when we come out of this, whoever is the first sport back can play a part in that and start helping normalize things and get people back to a normal way of life. Obviously it’s probably going to be tough for a little while, but hopefully sports can be a start or a part of the healing process going forward."
"I think over the course of history you’ve seen that sports helps heal people and situations. So hopefully when we come out of this, whoever is the first sport back can play a part in that and start helping normalize things and get people back to a normal way of life. Obviously it’s probably going to be tough for a little while, but hopefully sports can be a start or a part of the healing process going forward."
"I think over the course of history you’ve seen that sports helps heal people and situations. So hopefully when we come out of this, whoever is the first sport back can play a part in that and start helping normalize things and get people back to a normal way of life. Obviously it’s probably going to be tough for a little while, but hopefully sports can be a start or a part of the healing process going forward."
12:40 p.m. -- Milwaukee Public Schools expands stop, grab, and go lunch locations
12:40 p.m. -- Milwaukee Public Schools expands stop, grab, and go lunch locations
MPS already had 20 different locations for lunch pickup, but now they are adding five more.
MPS already had 20 different locations for lunch pickup, but now they are adding five more.
Starting Monday, parents are students will be able to pick up lunches from these additional locations:
Starting Monday, parents are students will be able to pick up lunches from these additional locations:
Metcalfe School
3400 W. North Ave., Milwaukee, WI 53208
11:00 a.m. - 1:00 p.m.
11:00 a.m. - 1:00 p.m.
Bruce School
6453 N. 89th St., Milwaukee, WI 53224
11:00 a.m. - 11:45 a.m.
11:00 a.m. - 11:45 a.m.
Fletcher Elementary
9500 W. Allyn St., Milwaukee, WI 53224
11:00 a.m. - 1:00 p.m.
11:00 a.m. - 1:00 p.m.
Holmes School
2463 N. Buffum St., Milwaukee, WI 53212
11:00 a.m. - 1:00 p.m.
11:00 a.m. - 1:00 p.m.
Maple Tree School
6644 N. 107th St., Milwaukee, WI 53224
12:00 p.m. - 1:00 p.m.
12:00 p.m. - 1:00 p.m.
"We have identified a need for additional sites to make sure that all our students and families have access to the resources we are providing during this pandemic," MPS Superintendent Dr. Keith P. Posley said.
"We have identified a need for additional sites to make sure that all our students and families have access to the resources we are providing during this pandemic," MPS Superintendent Dr. Keith P. Posley said.
All of these locations, plus the other 20, are open every weekday through the end of the academic year.
All of these locations, plus the other 20, are open every weekday through the end of the academic year.
In addition to the lunches, MPS will continue to distribute Chromebooks to students in order to help them take part in online learning.
In addition to the lunches, MPS will continue to distribute Chromebooks to students in order to help them take part in online learning.
For updates from MPS regarding coronavirus, click here.
For updates from MPS regarding coronavirus, click here.
For updates from MPS regarding coronavirus, click here.
11:58 a.m. -- Shalom Wildlife Zoo in West Bend now offering drive-thru exhibits
11:58 a.m. -- Shalom Wildlife Zoo in West Bend now offering drive-thru exhibits
West Bend's Shalom Wildlife Zoo is now offering drive-thru exhibits for you and your family.
West Bend's Shalom Wildlife Zoo is now offering drive-thru exhibits for you and your family.
Due to Governor Tony Evers' Safer at Home order, families are unable to head to a local zoo and check out the animals. However, now you can thanks to Shalom Wildlife Zoo.
Due to Governor Tony Evers' Safer at Home order, families are unable to head to a local zoo and check out the animals. However, now you can thanks to Shalom Wildlife Zoo.
Every Friday through Monday, from 10 a.m. until 5 p.m., the zoo will allow you to drive your vehicle through the zoo and check out some of the animals.
Every Friday through Monday, from 10 a.m. until 5 p.m., the zoo will allow you to drive your vehicle through the zoo and check out some of the animals.
Admission is $10 for anyone 13 or older, $5 for kids, and children 2 and under get in for free.
Admission is $10 for anyone 13 or older, $5 for kids, and children 2 and under get in for free.
If you plan to take your family, there are a few rules and requests from the zoo. First, everyone must remain in their vehicles. You are not allowed to pet for feed the animals, and playground equipment and bathrooms are closed.
If you plan to take your family, there are a few rules and requests from the zoo. First, everyone must remain in their vehicles. You are not allowed to pet for feed the animals, and playground equipment and bathrooms are closed.
The zoo is also requesting that visitors bring exact change in order to prevent the exchange of possible contaminated currency. Additionally, dogs are allowed in your vehicle, and motorcycles are prohibited.
The zoo is also requesting that visitors bring exact change in order to prevent the exchange of possible contaminated currency. Additionally, dogs are allowed in your vehicle, and motorcycles are prohibited.
For more information on the zoo or their drive-thru exhibits, visit their website here.
For more information on the zoo or their drive-thru exhibits, visit their website here.
For more information on the zoo or their drive-thru exhibits, visit their website here.
11:29 a.m. -- Lawmakers plan to ask the Supreme Court to block Evers' 'Safer at Home' extension
11:29 a.m. -- Lawmakers plan to ask the Supreme Court to block Evers' 'Safer at Home' extension
Following Governor Tony Evers' decision to extend the Safer at Home order through May 26, Republican lawmakers are planning to ask the Wisconsin Supreme Court to block the extension.
Following Governor Tony Evers' decision to extend the Safer at Home order through May 26, Republican lawmakers are planning to ask the Wisconsin Supreme Court to block the extension.
Evers made the announcement on Thursday, extending the order through May 26. With the extension, Evers also ordered that all schools remain closed for the rest of the academic year.
Evers made the announcement on Thursday, extending the order through May 26. With the extension, Evers also ordered that all schools remain closed for the rest of the academic year.
Wisconsin State Senator Alberta Darling said that she, and fellow republican lawmakers, plan to take their fight to block Evers' extension to the Supreme Court.
Wisconsin State Senator Alberta Darling said that she, and fellow republican lawmakers, plan to take their fight to block Evers' extension to the Supreme Court.
Wisconsin State Senator Alberta Darling said that she, and fellow republican lawmakers, plan to take their fight to block Evers' extension to the Supreme Court.

Lawmakers plan to ask the Supreme Court to block Evers' 'Safer at Home' extension

"Actually, the governor passed his authority over to the secretary of health and human services and she basically is a bureaucrat who does not have jurisdictions over the legislature," said Darling. "We are the elected officials and she has bypassed our role. Usually what happens when a secretary has a policy, she has to run it through our rules process, have hearings, and run it through it our rules committee and have it approved by the legislature. He's totally disregarded that oversight and that's automatically wrong. I don't want a bureaucrat telling me how to shut down business and how to stay in my home. "
"Actually, the governor passed his authority over to the secretary of health and human services and she basically is a bureaucrat who does not have jurisdictions over the legislature," said Darling. "We are the elected officials and she has bypassed our role. Usually what happens when a secretary has a policy, she has to run it through our rules process, have hearings, and run it through it our rules committee and have it approved by the legislature. He's totally disregarded that oversight and that's automatically wrong. I don't want a bureaucrat telling me how to shut down business and how to stay in my home. "
Wisconsinites have protested at both the capitol and at Evers' home. Additionally, republicans have voiced their opinion saying the state needs to open sooner than that.
Wisconsinites have protested at both the capitol and at Evers' home. Additionally, republicans have voiced their opinion saying the state needs to open sooner than that.
Now, those lawmakers are saying they're going to go to the Supreme Court and ask them to block Evers' order.
Now, those lawmakers are saying they're going to go to the Supreme Court and ask them to block Evers' order.
It is unclear if they would negotiate a new date or let the state open on April 24, as previously scheduled.
It is unclear if they would negotiate a new date or let the state open on April 24, as previously scheduled.
It is unclear if they would negotiate a new date or let the state open on April 24, as previously scheduled.
10:57 a.m. -- Owner of Jackson's Blue Ribbon Pub in Wauwatosa says he won't follow 'Safer at Home' extension, plans to reopen later this week
10:57 a.m. -- Owner of Jackson's Blue Ribbon Pub in Wauwatosa says he won't follow 'Safer at Home' extension, plans to reopen later this week
One local bar and restaurant owner announced that he will not be following Gov. Tony Evers' Safer at Home order extension.
One local bar and restaurant owner announced that he will not be following Gov. Tony Evers' Safer at Home order extension.
According to a public Facebook post, he will reopen his establishments when the order was initially supposed to end on April 24.
According to a public Facebook post, he will reopen his establishments when the order was initially supposed to end on April 24.
Dan Zierath, the owner of Jackson's Blue Ribbon Pub in Wauwatosa, posted on Facebook Saturday saying he will not abide by Governor Tony Evers' Safer at Home order extension.
Dan Zierath, the owner of Jackson's Blue Ribbon Pub in Wauwatosa, posted on Facebook Saturday saying he will not abide by Governor Tony Evers' Safer at Home order extension.
Dan Zierath, the owner of Jackson's Blue Ribbon Pub in Wauwatosa, posted on Facebook Saturday saying he will not abide by Governor Tony Evers' Safer at Home order extension.

zierath post 2.JPG

"There is nothing going on in our state," Zierath said in the post. "Hospitals are empty and the death rate is less than minimal. Yes there are a couple of ZIP codes in Milwaukee that are a little worse but that's because they didn't follow the rules like the rest of us."
"There is nothing going on in our state," Zierath said in the post. "Hospitals are empty and the death rate is less than minimal. Yes there are a couple of ZIP codes in Milwaukee that are a little worse but that's because they didn't follow the rules like the rest of us."
On Thursday, Governor Evers extended the order through May 26 instead of the initial April 24. Hundreds of protesters gathered outside of Brookfield Square Mall Saturday to protest the extension.
On Thursday, Governor Evers extended the order through May 26 instead of the initial April 24. Hundreds of protesters gathered outside of Brookfield Square Mall Saturday to protest the extension.
In his post, Zierath says "it's time" to reopen, and anyone who isn't "comfy with comfortable, then by all means stay home until this thing passes."
In his post, Zierath says "it's time" to reopen, and anyone who isn't "comfy with comfortable, then by all means stay home until this thing passes."
According to Zierath's Facebook page, he also works at Zister's in Elm Grove and Thirsty Duck in Sussex. However, Zister's took to Facebook and announced they will be abiding by Governor Evers' order.
According to Zierath's Facebook page, he also works at Zister's in Elm Grove and Thirsty Duck in Sussex. However, Zister's took to Facebook and announced they will be abiding by Governor Evers' order.
According to Zierath's Facebook page, he also works at Zister's in Elm Grove and Thirsty Duck in Sussex. However, Zister's took to Facebook and announced they will be abiding by Governor Evers' order.
10:02 a.m. -- State election officials to investigate uncounted absentee ballots from recent election
10:02 a.m. -- State election officials to investigate uncounted absentee ballots from recent election
The Wisconsin Elections Commission voted to open an investigation into thousands of absentee ballots that were never returned or counted in the recent April 7th election.
The Wisconsin Elections Commission voted to open an investigation into thousands of absentee ballots that were never returned or counted in the recent April 7th election.
Commission members held a special meeting on Saturday to debrief after the recent election and to discuss how to improve the absentee voting process in the future.
Commission members held a special meeting on Saturday to debrief after the recent election and to discuss how to improve the absentee voting process in the future.
According to the latest data, 135,417 absentee ballots were never returned. At least 1.1 million absentee ballots were returned and counted, which commission administrators believe account for nearly 80% of the state's local election participation, according to Commission Administrator Meagan Wolfe.
According to the latest data, 135,417 absentee ballots were never returned. At least 1.1 million absentee ballots were returned and counted, which commission administrators believe account for nearly 80% of the state's local election participation, according to Commission Administrator Meagan Wolfe.
Wolfe said in a typical election, about 10 percent of the votes are absentee, and of those there's at least an 80 percent return rate. Commission data shows the absentee return rate for the April 7 election was 87.5 percent.
Wolfe said in a typical election, about 10 percent of the votes are absentee, and of those there's at least an 80 percent return rate. Commission data shows the absentee return rate for the April 7 election was 87.5 percent.
Still, thousands of people turned out at the polls on April 7. In Milwaukee, lines stretched around the block as voters waited for hours to cast their ballots.
Still, thousands of people turned out at the polls on April 7. In Milwaukee, lines stretched around the block as voters waited for hours to cast their ballots.
Still, thousands of people turned out at the polls on April 7. In Milwaukee, lines stretched around the block as voters waited for hours to cast their ballots.

Absentee ballot investigation underway after recent election

Commissioner Robert Spindell called for an investigation in Milwaukee, but the motion did not pass in a 3-3 vote.
Commissioner Robert Spindell called for an investigation in Milwaukee, but the motion did not pass in a 3-3 vote.
"Maybe they decided to stick with the five to make everything look absolutely possibly terrible," Spindell said.
"Maybe they decided to stick with the five to make everything look absolutely possibly terrible," Spindell said.
"I do not think that anyone involved in this election was putting people intentionally at risk for political points," said Commissioner Ann Jacobs.
"I do not think that anyone involved in this election was putting people intentionally at risk for political points," said Commissioner Ann Jacobs.
The Commission went on to discuss how to improve the absentee ballot system for future elections. It voted to allow the Commission staff to get to work on its recommendation of putting barcodes on absentee ballots. According to the Commission's summary report, that way voters could track their ballot "like they would any other important package," through the MyVote website.
The Commission went on to discuss how to improve the absentee ballot system for future elections. It voted to allow the Commission staff to get to work on its recommendation of putting barcodes on absentee ballots. According to the Commission's summary report, that way voters could track their ballot "like they would any other important package," through the MyVote website.
"We wouldn't have these complaints of somebody saying my vote is, where is it," said Commissioner Mark Thomsen. "We would know, whether it's sitting in a bin in Milwaukee, something, a voter can track it."
"We wouldn't have these complaints of somebody saying my vote is, where is it," said Commissioner Mark Thomsen. "We would know, whether it's sitting in a bin in Milwaukee, something, a voter can track it."
Click here to see historical updates from April 12-18.
Click here to see historical updates from April 12-18.
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Coronavirus in Wisconsin

More data on Wisconsin's vaccination progress here.

Find a vaccination site here.

Check out county-by-county coronavirus case numbers here.

More information: COVID-19 on the Wisconsin DHS website

Latest news and headlines here.