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Gov. Tony Evers extends Wisconsin's 'Safer at Home' order until May 26

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Posted at 12:55 PM, Apr 16, 2020
and last updated 2020-04-19 09:45:05-04

WISCONSIN — Governor Tony Evers announced Thursday that he was extending Wisconsin's Safer at Home order until May 26.

The Safer at Home order that went into effect on March 25 was originally set to expire on April 24.

Full announcement: Gov. Tony Evers extends Wisconsin's 'Safer at Home' order until May 26

“A few weeks ago, we had a pretty grim outlook for what COVID-19 could mean for our state, but because of the efforts of all of you, Safer at Home is working. That said, we aren't out of the woods just yet,” said Gov. Evers in a press release. “As I've said all along, we are going to rely on the science and public health experts to guide us through this challenge. So, as we extend Safer at Home, I need all of you to continue doing the good work you've been doing so we can keep our families, our neighbors, and our communities safe, and get through this storm together.”

Since the original order went into effect, Evers told President Trump the state is facing a $2 billion loss in revenue, according to the Associated Press.

Evers and the governors from Michigan and Pennsylvania sent Trump a letter Wednesday asking him to urge Congress to send $500 billion in budget aid to states and local governments.

The letter was sent that same day that Evers signed a bill passed by the Republican-controlled Wisconsin Legislature that clears the way for spending about $2 billion the state is receiving in federal funds.

The extension of the Safer at Home order also included some changes. Some of the changes allowed more business to reopen and activities to resume.

According to the order, the following items are changing:

  • Public libraries: Public libraries may now provide curb-side pick-up of books and other library materials.
  • Golf Courses: Golf courses may open again, with restrictions including scheduling and paying for tee times online or by phone only. Clubhouses and pro shops must remain closed.
  • Non-essential Businesses: Non-essential businesses will now be able to do more things as Minimum Basic Operations, including deliveries, mailings, and curb-side pick-up. Non-essential businesses must notify workers of whether they are necessary for the Minimum Basic Operations.
  • Arts and Crafts Stores: Arts and craft stores may offer expanded curb-side pick-up of materials necessary to make face masks or other personal protective equipment (PPE).
  • Aesthetic or Optional Exterior Work: Aesthetic or optional exterior lawn care or construction is now allowed under the extended order, so long as it can be done by one person.
  • Schools: Public and private K-12 schools will remain closed for the remainder of the 2019-2020 school year.
  • Local parks and open space: Local health officials may close public parks and open spaces if it becomes too difficult to ensure social distancing or the areas are being mistreated.
  • Travel: People are strongly encourage to stay close to home, not travel to second homes or cabins, and not to travel out-of-state if it is not necessary.
  • Tribal Nations: Tribal Nations are sovereign over their territory and can impose their own restrictions. Non-tribal members should be respectful of and avoid non-essential travel to Tribal territory. Local government must coordinate, collaborate, and share information with Tribal Nations.
  • Duration: The changes in this order go into effect on April 24, 2020. The order will remain in effect until 8 a.m. on May 26, 2020.

Read the governor's full order below:

This is a developing story, check back with TMJ4 for updates.

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