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Wisconsin's extended Safer at Home order relaxes restrictions on non-essential businesses

The Waxwing fights to survive Coronavirus impacts
Posted at 12:44 PM, Apr 24, 2020
and last updated 2020-04-24 16:09:02-04

MILWAUKEE — Wisconsin's extended 'Safer-at-Home' order began Friday, lifting some of the restrictions previously put in place on non-essential businesses throughout the state.

The governor's order allows public libraries, arts and craft stores, and other non-essential businesses to re-open and offer curbside and delivery services. Golf courses are also allowed to open under new guidelines.

Leaders at Milwaukee Public Libraries are still trying to determine if they will open, according to a librarian on April 24.

Strict social distancing rules and essential travel guidelines remain in place until May 26.

"To me it’s just a challenge to be creative," said Steph Davies, who owns The Waxwing, a local shop that sells handmade art pieces and goods. "I have been a non-essential business, which means the curbside and the delivery was not really in the realm of what we should be doing. So, that opens us up to be a part of that."

Davies had been relying solely on online sales and mailed deliveries for the past several weeks as Coronavirus forced her customers to stay away from her storefront on Milwaukee's East side. Now, because of the lifted restrictions under the Governor's newly extended order, Davies can offer curbside and delivery sales and she will be able to bring back at least two of her employees.

"It's nice to have them back on board and support them," said Davies.

Area golf courses are also allowed to re-open. Eight courses in Milwaukee County opened at 8 a.m. on Friday.

Under the new Safer at Home extension, all golfers must reserve and pay for their round of golf online or by phone, golfers must practice social distancing, and club houses and pro-shops must remains closed.

Reggie Riley was among the first golfers to show up at Lincoln Park Golf Course Friday and he said he did not feel unsafe returning to the tee.

"Were going to grocery stores, were doing a lot of other things," said Riley. "There's a lot of room out here to have six feet between each other."

Other non-essential businesses have other rules they must comply with as well in order to stay open under the extended Safer at Home order. Davies said she was more than happy to comply.

"I think there’s enough community support there that we can make it through this longer stay at home and do it safely."

A lawsuit has been filed by Wisconsin lawmakers who argue the restrictions on businesses should be lifted even further in order to save Wisconsin's economy due to the initial shutdown.

Governor Tony Evers has said he needs to see more proof that Wisconsin is recovering from Coronavirus consistently before lifting the Safer at Home order even further.

Here are some of the changes taking effect on April 24:

Public libraries: Public libraries may now provide curb-side pick-up of books and other library materials.
Golf Courses: Golf courses may open again, with restrictions including scheduling and paying for tee times online or by phone only. Clubhouses and pro shops must remain closed.
Non-essential Businesses: Non-essential businesses will now be able to do more things as Minimum Basic Operations, including deliveries, mailings, and curb-side pick-up. Non-essential businesses must notify workers of whether they are necessary for the Minimum Basic Operations.
Arts and Crafts Stores: Arts and craft stores may offer expanded curb-side pick-up of materials necessary to make face masks or other personal protective equipment (PPE).
Aesthetic or Optional Exterior Work: Aesthetic or optional exterior lawn care or construction is now allowed under the extended order, so long as it can be done by one person.

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