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Kenosha outlines emergency order ahead of Jacob Blake decision

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Posted at 7:45 PM, Dec 31, 2020
and last updated 2020-12-31 20:45:15-05

KENOSHA — The City of Kenosha has outlined an emergency order ahead of the decision on whether to press charges against the Police Officer Rusten Sheskey who shot Jacob Blake.

According to the Kenosha Common Council agenda for Jan. 4, the city District Attorney will deliver his decision within the first two weeks of January. Following the eight days after the decision, this emergency order will be in effect.

Furthermore, the agenda says the city has taken measures to protect property and people ahead of any potential unrest following the decision.

"Be it further resolved, based in part on the duration of the violence the City of Kenosha experienced in May, August, and September 2020, as well as that of other communities nationally, the Common Council for the City of Kenosha finds that emergency conditions are likely to persist for at least eight (8) days. Therefore, pursuant to Wisconsin Statute § 323.11, the period of this emergency declaration will end automatically at 11:59 P.M. on the eighth (8th) day after the emergency goes into effect, and this Resolution will no longer be effective beyond that point, unless otherwise extended," the agenda said.

The city came to its decision after outlining how despite law enforcement's best efforts, they were unable to contain overnight unrest that resulted in significant damage happening to several businesses in the downtown area. In addition to damage, two people were shot and killed in one night.

It also cited damage and unrest that happened in Milwaukee and Wauwatosa as reasons for creating this preemptive emergency order.

This is in addition to an op-ed that the Mayor and Police Chief wrote in the Kenosha News asking for peace in the city following the decision.

“Regardless of the decision, people will have differing opinions and strong emotions about it. That is everyone’s right. Whether you agree or disagree, we ask that you express your opinions peacefully and lawfully. We will not — we can not — tolerate the kind of violence we saw on our streets earlier this year and we will take definitive steps to protect our residents and businesses,” wrote Mayor Antaramian, and Police Chief Miskinis.

It all started on Aug. 23 when Kenosha Police shot Jacob Blake after responding to a 'domestic incident'.

In a video of the incident, which was taken from across the street, Blake walks around the front of his SUV to his driver-side door as officers follow him with their guns pointed. As Blake opens the door and leans into the SUV, at least one officer opens fire while Blake has his back turned. Seven shots can be heard.

Multiple days and nights of protests ensued that draw the eyes of the entire nation. Both President Trump and President-Elect Joe Biden came to Kenosha to speak with the community and the Blake family.

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