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Friend reflects on last speech college player gave before tragic death

Posted at 7:29 PM, Jul 25, 2016

WAUKESHA COUNTY, Wis. --- One of the college football players killed in a car accident Saturday night gave an inspiring speech to a group of high school players, just hours before his death.

When Sam Foltz spoke to more than 500 young athletes, he didn't know it would be his last speech, but those who heard it said he inspired a lot of people.

"He lived every child's dream of playing for that big team," said Clark Riedel, a fellow coach at the Kohl's Kicking Camp where Foltz was working.

Riedel remembered Foltz telling the high school players in his last speech about his path to play for Nebraska. Foltz said it was always his dream to play there but he didn't get a scholarship. Instead, he worked hard and walked on as a wide-receiver.

"I think what really hit home for them is saying if you really work hard and focus yourself you can try to accomplish anything like what he did," said Riedel. "He walked on and was just able to roll with the punches. He thought he was going to be a receiver and it turns out he becomes one of the best punters I've ever known."

Foltz, 22, and Mike Sadler, 24, both died Saturday night after Sadler lost control while driving on Beaver Lake Road in the Town of Merton. The initial investigation shows that the vehicle was going west on Beaver Lake Road, lost control on the wet pavement, left the roadway and struck a tree.

A third passenger, Colby J. Delahoussaye, 21, of New Iberia, Louisiana was taken to the hospital. According to the Lincoln Journal-Star, Delahoussaye is currently a senior punter at LSU.

Sadler was a former Michigan State punter and was planning to attend law school. Foltz was a senior on the Nebraska football team.

Riedel said he considered Foltz and Sadler brothers and that this was a devastating loss to the college football community.

"They had an impact on a lot of people's lives whether they knew it or not," said Riedel. "And it's really nice to see how many lives they touched and I hope that their families take that into comfort."