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Brown County confirms first case of monkeypox

Monkeypox
Posted at 12:39 PM, Aug 05, 2022
and last updated 2022-08-05 13:39:53-04

BROWN COUNTY (NBC 26)  — Brown County identified its first confirmed case of monkeypox Friday. The patient is isolated while public health officials work to investigate who the person had contact with.

As of Thursday, the Wisconsin Department of Health Services has identified 23 cases of monkeypox in Wisconsin.

“At this time, there is no need for concern or alarm,” Brown County Public Health Officer Anna Nick said in a press release. “We continue to work closely with DHS and our health care partners to monitor the status of monkeypox here in Brown County. The risk of widespread transmission in our community remains low.”

Current evidence shows that the virus is spreading mostly through close, intimate contact with someone who is infected with monkeypox, and does not spread easily from person to person, according to the health department's press release. Monkeypox is transmitted through respiratory droplets, sustained skin-to-skin contact, and contact with items that have been contaminated with the fluids or sores of a person with monkeypox.

“The vaccine is being prioritized for those with a known exposure to someone with monkeypox and people with certain risk factors who are more likely to be exposed to the virus,” said De Pere Public Health Officer Debbie Armbruster and Oneida Nation Public Health Officer Michelle Myers in a joint statement. “It is still important for everyone in Brown County to be aware of the signs and symptoms of monkeypox to help prevent the spread in our communities.”

The JYNNEOS vaccine is currently available in Wisconsin for the following people:

  • People who know that a sexual partner in the past 14 days was diagnosed with monkey pox.
  • People who attended an event or venue where there was known monkeypox exposure.
  • Gay, bisexual persons, trans persons, or any person who has sex with their partner, and gender non-conforming/non-binary individuals, who have had multiple sexual partners in the last 14 days.

To protect yourself and your loved ones and to prevent the spread of monkeypox, local public health departments are encouraging the community to be aware of the following:

  • Know the symptoms and risk factors of monkeypox. Anyone with a rash that looks like monkeypox should talk to a doctor or nurse about whether they need to get tested, even if they don’t think they had contact with someone who has monkeypox.
  • Avoid skin-to-skin contact with people who are showing a rash or skin sores. Don’t touch the rash or scabs, and don’t kiss, hug, cuddle, have sex, or share items such as eating utensils or bedding with someone with monkeypox.
  • In jurisdictions with known monkeypox spread, participating in activities with close, personal, skin-to-skin contact may pose a higher risk of exposure.
  • If you were recently exposed to the virus, contact a doctor or nurse to talk about whether you need a vaccine to prevent disease. Monitor your health for fever, chills, swollen lymph nodes and a new, unexplained rash, and contact a health care provider if any of those occur. If you become ill, avoid contact with others until you receive health care.

You can find more information on symptoms, prevention, and treatment here: https://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/disease/monkeypox.htm

Free, confidential health care and community resources are available by dialing 211or calling 877-947-2211, or by texting your ZIP code to 898-211, or find resources online at 211Wisconsin.org.

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