NewsLocal News

Actions

What to do if you see baby wild animals this spring

Most baby wild animals spend long stretches alone. Help keep them safe by keeping your distance.
Posted at 11:40 AM, Apr 18, 2022
and last updated 2022-04-18 12:40:02-04

MILWAUKEE — The warm spring weather is coming, which means wild animals and their offspring will be on the move across Wisconsin.

According to the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, knowing what to do before finding a baby animal can make all the difference to protect its health and help keep wildlife wild.

The first suggestion is, “If you care, leave them there.”

The DNR says that it is perfectly natural for mothers to leave their young alone for periods of time.

While the mother looks for food, the baby is kept safe from predators until the baby is strong enough to go foraging for food with the mother.

You can visit here for more information on how to decide if a young wild animal is truly orphaned or in need of help.

Another beneficial tip is knowing when or when not to move a baby animal.

The DNR suggests that if you find a baby animal in a hazardous location near a roadway, you can carefully move it several yards to a safer spot.

However, before you act, make sure to put on gloves and a facemask to protect the animal's health.

The animal's mother will find her baby if it is moved only a short distance. Avoid touching the baby animals unless necessary, as human interaction can cause wild animals to reject their youth.

The last piece of advice is if you find a wild animal that appears sick or injured, the DNR says to leave it alone.

However, to help, take pictures and make notes about what you are observing. Then call DNR or a licensed wildlife rehabilitator for guidance.

If the rehabilitator determines the animal needs help, the DNR says to place the animal inside a ventilated container. Place the container somewhere that is dark, warm, and quiet until you can arrange transportation to a licensed wildlife rehabilitator.

Do not provide food or water; this can do more harm than good.

Click here for more recommendations for transporting wildlife.

Report a typo or error // Submit a news tip