Commission votes to approve recount timeline

MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- The Latest on Wisconsin presidential recount (all times local):

   10:15 a.m.

   The Wisconsin Elections Commission has voted unanimously to reject a request from Green Party candidate Jill Stein to conduct a hand recount of the presidential vote.

   Instead, the commission Monday voted to allow local election clerks to determine the method they would use for a recount.

   The recount of Wisconsin's presidential vote will begin Thursday if the state receives payment on Tuesday. The commission has given counties until noon Monday to submit estimated costs for the efforts so Stein can be billed. Independent candidate Rocky De La Fuente has also asked for a recount.

   Stein can ask a judge to order the recount be done by hand, which could considerably delay how quickly it gets done. Federal law requires the recount to be completed by Dec. 13.

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   10:05 a.m.

   The chairman of the Wisconsin Elections Commission says a recount of the presidential election will reassure voters that the election was fair and accurate.

   Mark Thomsen's comments Monday came before the commission voted to approve starting the recount Thursday, once it receives payment from one or both of the candidates who requested it. Local elections officials were to submit estimates for how much the recount will cost by noon Monday.

   Both Green Party presidential candidate Jill Stein and Independent presidential candidate Rocky De La Fuente on Friday requested a recount.

   Under federal law, the recount must be done by Dec. 13. The commission voted to have the counties submit their recounted totals by 8 p.m. on Dec. 12.

   Wisconsin's unofficial election results show Donald Trump with 1,404,000 votes and Hillary Clinton with 1,381,823 votes.

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   9:40 a.m.

   A computer expert is telling Wisconsin election officials that the state's presidential recount must be conducted manually.

   Green Party presidential candidate Jill Stein has asked for a recount in Wisconsin and is preparing to ask for recounts in Michigan and Pennsylvania, saying she wants to make sure the results weren't hacked.

   Stein's request includes an affidavit from J. Alex Halderman, who states he's a computer scientist at the University of Michigan. He wrote in the affidavit that the only way to determine whether a cyberattack affected the results is to count ballots manually and examine the voting equipment. He says the records in the equipment could have been manipulated in an attack.

   Stein would have to get a court order for a hand recount. Her campaign spokeswoman didn't respond to messages Monday inquiring about whether the campaign would go to a judge.

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   8:45 a.m.

   The recount of Wisconsin's presidential election could begin on Thursday.

   That's the proposed start date that the Wisconsin Elections Commission is to vote on approving Monday. The commission is holding an emergency telephone conference to approve the timeline.

   Starting the recount on Thursday is dependent upon the commission receiving payment from those who requested the recount.

   Both Green Party presidential candidate Jill Stein and Independent presidential candidate Rocky De La Fuente on Friday requested a recount.

   Wisconsin counties were to submit estimates for the cost of the recount to the state commission by noon Monday. The commission won't issue the recount order until payment is received.

   Under federal law, the recount must be done by Dec. 13.

   Wisconsin's unofficial election results show Donald Trump with 1,404,000 votes and Hillary Clinton with 1,381,823 votes.

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   12:03 a.m.

   Wisconsin election officials are meeting to go over a timeline for a recount of the state's presidential election.

   The recount comes at the request of Green Party candidate Jill Stein, who says it's important to determine whether hacking may have affected the results. Stein says she also plans to request recounts in Pennsylvania and Michigan.

   President-elect Donald Trump narrowly won Wisconsin and Pennsylvania and has a small lead in Michigan. There's no evidence voter results were hacked or electronic voting machines were compromised.

   Hillary Clinton's campaign formally joined Stein's Wisconsin effort over the weekend.

   Wisconsin officials say it will be tough to finish the recount by the federally required deadline of Dec. 13.

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