Girls accused in Slender Man stabbing seek release

WAUKESHA, Wis. (AP) -- Two Wisconsin girls accused of trying to kill their friend as a sacrifice to the horror fiction character Slender Man are seeking their release after nearly two years in custody, saying in court papers Wednesday that they're not dangerous and can safely return to their families.

The girls are currently being held on $500,000 bonds. Their lawyers outlined release plans that include therapy, round-the-clock supervision and electronic monitoring.

An attorney for one of the girls also says that his client was sexually assaulted last year at the county detention center where she's still being held.

Prosecuting attorney Ted Szczupakiewicz declined comment Wednesday on the girls' requests. A judge will consider them on Friday.

The girls were 12 years old when authorities say they lured their friend into the woods after a birthday sleepover and stabbed her repeatedly. The friend, who was also 12, was found along a road, bleeding from wounds that nearly killed her.

The Associated Press hasn't identified the alleged attackers because their cases could move to juvenile court, where proceedings are closed. The girls face trial as adults, but that decision is under review. It's not clear when an appeals court would rule.

Judge Michael Bohren held a phone hearing Wednesday afternoon to discuss the sex assault allegation involving one of the girls. He said he was "concerned that it happened" and "very concerned that there was no report of it until today."

Tony Cotton, whose client is now 13, provided few details and didn't give the accused assailant's full name. He said that as it pertains to release, "the more salient issue is the improved mental health functioning of his client." His previous efforts to reduce his client's bond to an amount her family could afford have failed.

   Cotton's client would go to live with her grandparents in Manitowoc County under his plan.

   The other girl, now 14, would live in Waukesha County in a home provided by her family. Her attorney, Maura McMahon, did not say with whom the girl would be living. This is McMahon's first attempt to reduce her client's bond.

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